GroovyGuru

What would stage Green and Tier 2 video games look like?

67 posts in this topic

@Dryas i remember the days when battlefield 3 came out. 64 players on a team-deathmatch. Bullets coming left and right, tanks destroying stuff and rpgs flying over your head. Jets and helis crashing on your base. Not a single second without action. Total chaos xD

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It's about genre? Or story? I don't really understand how to put game in some stage. Shooters are mostly red? I can understand that. Is Turquoise games necessarily a simulator? Or it would be that in story explained specifical stage values.

I'm always loved adventure genre in video games like I have no mouth and I Must Scream, Myst, Legends of Kyrandia. Some of RPG too like Planescape:Torment. What stage in dynamics are these games? And I will appreciate you name Turquoise/Yellow/Green Quests-Adventures if they exist.

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1 minute ago, Frenk said:

@Dryas i remember the days when battlefield 3 came out. 64 players on a team-deathmatch. Bullets coming left and right, tanks destroying stuff and rpgs flying over your head. Jets and helis crashing on your base. Not a single second without action. Total chaos xD

I've played quite a bit of battlefield 1 myself. Great stuff.

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3 minutes ago, pdude said:

And I will appreciate you name Turquoise/Yellow/Green Quests-Adventures if they exist.

What about this?

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@Boethius Mass Effect is totally Orange. Just because it's story-based doesn't mean it's Yellow.

The same goes for Bioshock series, Orange or lower.

I would say Undertale passes as Green, you can finish the game without killing anyone.

Edited by Girzo

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39 minutes ago, Eren Eeager said:

nah, it is red 

Relative to the perspective of the game’s content, it’s definitely red. Relative to the player’s perspective who assigns meaning to the overall story and theme, it’s in the green region for sure.

When we’re assessing an SD stage to a game, it makes sense to analyze the game in its entirety rather than just looking at the surface level content.

A game doesn’t have to be colorful and cheery to deliver an overall stage green or above message. 

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@Girzo I was thinking Yellow because there are personal relationships in the game (optional romantic interests even) along with very "holistic" story lines.

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@Frenk

16 minutes ago, Frenk said:

What about this?

Great visuals! I will definitely try that. Thanks.

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Wait are we talking about complexity of structure or values?


If you have no confidence in yourself, you are twice defeated in the race of life. But with confidence you have won, even before you start.” -- Marcus Garvey

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For a Yellow/turquoise themed game and more a philosophical perspective. 

I would say the Deus Ex series. 

 

Its brings the ethical topics of transhumanism in a world that is full of 1 Tier thinkers like red, orange etc. 

 

I think before we should even think about a mechanical improvement of our outer world. 
We should first consider improving our inner world.
(referring to a collective improvement of a group of people) 

 

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Which SD stage would be The Sims game ?


 explain grammar to an alien ?

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@Dryas I can't help but feel the same lol.... I've never been into those city/community-building types of games. Some of the adventure/puzzle/exploration games mentioned on here seem a bit more interesting though. 

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@GroovyGuru The content of the game is important, but I think the level of consciousness of both the designer and the consumer also play a part in making a video game Tier 2. Tier 1 is still very dualistic. In Tier 2 the duality between the game and the gamer is being broken down. Does the consumer realise he literally created the game? Does the consumer see the game as a creative loving expression of God? Also, if the designer himself is not consciously developed, the game will reflect that. So overall I don't see the content of the game as so important, but rather the perspective in which it is created and consumed. But it would be cool to see games that explore spiritual ideas. 

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Nothing can be more tier 2 than the Nier series.

This game was praised as the most philosophical game ever made.

The story is “Metaphysics made literal.”

The game tackles more themes that Leo has talked about than any game I’ve seen. One of my favorite themes mostly from the first game is, after mindless slaughtering thousands of enemies (very common for a video game) you slowly realize that YOU, the main character is actually the most evil character, and then the game forces you to keep killing. That’s some deep psychological stuff. 
‘Here’s another review.

 

Edited by Finax

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Journey, quite literally the spiritual journey:

 

The Talos Principle, puzzle game retelling of God's Garden, philosophy, AI, consciousness, etc:

Both absolute masterpieces

Edited by Display_Name

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It's definitely difficult to characterize games this way, but kinda a fun topic.  HUGE SPOILERS FOR THE GAME AHEAD.

My pick:  Final Fantasy X

The reason is that the plot like that had never been done in a video game to the degree it was.  

1)  It addresses religion and shows it's capacity to manipulate and be used for nefarious purposes.  The main characters eventually question dogmatic aspects of the religion which would have led to the sacrifice and death of one of the main characters and also continued the cycle of suffering and death in the world.  The supposed God of the religion "Yu Yevon," was actually was the essence of a wizard from the distant past.  Yu Yevon was able to perpetuate itself for thousands of years through the cycle that the religion created with Summoners and a pilgrimage to destroy "Sin" which was a giant monster entity, summoned by Yu Yevon, that caused destruction and suffering in the world.

2)  It also addresses racism and xenophobia, as well as a fear of progress and scientific discovery.  The aforementioned religion deemed "Machina" or machine technology as something that was sacrilegious.  The people falsely attributed the presence of the monster "Sin" as a result of the use of machine technology.  There was a race of people that were banished to an island because of their use of technology.  You as the player even fight them and see them as the bad guys throughout most of the game until a particular part.  But the game's plot explores this idea with so much nuance, no game has done it like they did since.  

3)  It also explores spiritual idea's.  The main character, who's life you explore in the end you learn that his entire existence was a lie.  He and everything about him was a dream brought into the world for the purpose of defeating "Sin,"  the final boss of the game.  Once that purpose is completed the dream ends and so does his existence.  The final scene with him is him fading out of existence as he jumps through the clouds off an airship.  He dies.  

Imagine playing this shit when you're 12.  Some of the aspects of the game have not aged too well, but the story is one of a kind and was extremely ambitious.  Maybe the most ambitious I've ever seen in a video game, no one has done anything like it since.  People don't appreciate this games story enough in my opinion.  

Edited by Heart of Space

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