StateOfMind

Thoughts on Carl Jung?

12 posts in this topic

Great playlist by Max Derrat

Do you also connect with symbolism and Jungian psychology in general?
Why does it seem that there is a link between spirituality (whatever that means) and symbols, archetypes, gods, shadow, and concepts like: things going full circle?

"But something seems off, cuz when i watch a documentary about Mathematics, it seems like god/Devin/consciousness is dreaming Math, but when i read Jung, it seems like this consists of spirit! i know this is a dualistic approach but..."

Any thoughts?

EDIT: Leo also talked about the Hero journey myth (things going full circle), so the whole things seems like it's on to something!

Edited by StateOfMind

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Jung is great to study for shadow work. There's a shadow work book on the booklist which takes a lot of Jung's insights and puts them into the context of the spiritual path. I also like Shunyamurti's understanding and take on Jung's ideas, he takes them beyond what Jung understood himself. He was certainly in contact with his true Self.
 

This is amazing (check 7:45): 

 

Edited by peanutspathtotruth

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On 1/22/2021 at 6:48 PM, peanutspathtotruth said:

Jung is great to study for shadow work. There's a shadow work book on the booklist which takes a lot of Jung's insights and puts them into the context of the spiritual path. I also like Shunyamurti's understanding and take on Jung's ideas, he takes them beyond what Jung understood himself. He was certainly in contact with his true Self.
 

This is amazing (check 7:45): 

 

Shunyamurti is kinda scary for me, because when he feels like a prophet or something!

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1 minute ago, StateOfMind said:

Shunyamurti is kinda scary for me, because when he feels like a prophet or something!

Yeah his distopyan ramblings can be a bit strange and prophetic, I agree. That doesn't take away from the amazing wisdom he shares though. Always be your own authority and you're safe to open to his (or anyone's) teachings - maybe pick older ones, before Corona started. 

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Jung had a great mind, some of his quotes are all time classics to me. 

"Who looks outside dreams, who looks inside awakes." Genius. 

Edited by Megan Alecia

"Both in thought and in feeling, even though time be real, to realise the unimportance of time is the gate of wisdom." ~ Bertrand Russell

My YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWwoor0pG0isF4tltOlwzRw

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His ideas of the shadow and on dream interpretation have been useful for me. That's all i know him for though

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Jung was such a genius and I still keep learning so much from him. He was an ocean. I wish we could have someone like him again. 

 


Whatever be the status quo of the system, regardless of whatever, a person should have to feel cared for  and there is no excuse in the whole universe why a person should not have to feel cared for.. 

Preety preety

 

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A very close person to me is an expert Jungian analist  (+15 years of study). To your surprise, (also to mine tbh), Carl Jung was fully awake but he only talked/studied till the abysm of the mind. He understood and experienced what was beyond, but he decided to explain perfectly how the mind works so people could make that jump easily. Instead of talking from the abysm as a guru he decided to talk from the ground that people understood. That's what he told me at least.

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Outstanding mind. Reading his books always leaves me inspired and speechless.


The true heresy is hearsay.

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I've always felt an affinity for Carl Jung's ideas, particularly the concepts of synchronicity, individuation and how they relate to Taoism. I still look through Man and his Symbols every now and again to revise my favourite quotes and passages. I thought I'd list them here:

"Synchronistic events almost invariably accompany the crucial phases of the process of individuation."

"As soon as we notice that certain types of event "like" to cluster together at certain times, we begin to understand the attitude of the Chinese, whose theories of medicine, philosophy, and even building are based on a "science" of meaningful coincidences. The classical Chinese texts did not ask what causes what, but rather what "likes" to occur with what."

"Trying to give the living reality of the Self a constant amount of daily attention is like trying to live simultaneously on two levels or in two different worlds. One gives one's mind, as before, to outer duties, but at the same time one remains alert for hints and signs, both in dreams and in external events, that the Self uses to symbolize its intentions – the direction in which the life-stream is moving.

Old Chinese texts that are concerned with this kind of experience often use the simile of the cat watching the mousehole. One text says that one should allow no other thoughts to intrude, but one's attention should not be too sharp – nor should it be too dull. There is exactly the right level of perception. If the training is undergone in this manner… it will be effective as time goes on, and when the cause comes to fruition, like a ripe melon that automatically falls, anything it may happen to touch or make contact with will suddenly cause the individual's supreme awakening. This is the moment when the practitioner will be like one who drinks water and alone knows whether it is cold or warm. He becomes free of all doubts about himself and experiences a great happiness similar to that one feels in meeting one's own father at the crossroads."

"People living in cultures more securely rooted than our own have less trouble in understanding that it is necessary to give up the utilitarian attitude of conscious planning in order to make way for the inner growth of the personality. I once met an elderly lady who had not achieved much in her life, in terms of outward achievement. But she had in fact made a good marriage with a difficult husband, and had somehow developed into a mature personality. When she complained to me that she had not "done" anything in her life, I told her a story related by a Chinese sage, Chuang-Tzu. She understood immediately and felt great relief.

"[The carpenter in Chuang-Tzu's story] saw that simply to fulfil one's destiny is the greatest human achievement, and that our utilitarian notions have to give way in the face of the demands of our unconscious psyche; If we translate this metaphor into psychological language, the tree symbolizes the process of individuation, giving a lesson to our short-sighted ego."

"Under the tree that fulfilled its destiny, there was—in Chuang-Tzu's story —an earth-altar. This was a crude, unwrought stone upon which people made sacrifices to the local god who "owned" this piece of land. The symbol of the earth-altar points to the fact that in order to bring the individuation process into reality, one must surrender consciously to the power of the unconscious, instead of thinking in terms of what one should do, or of what is generally thought right, or of what usually happens. One must simply listen, in order to learn what the inner totality the Self wants one to do here and now in a particular situation."

"Like the tree, we should give in to this almost imperceptible, yet powerfully dominating, impulse. An impulse that comes from the urge toward unique, creative self-realization.

The guiding hints or impulses come, not from the ego, but from the totality of the psyche: the Self."

"It is, moreover, useless to cast furtive glances at the way someone else is developing, because each of us has a unique task of self-realization."

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