Leo Gura

Kriya Yoga Mega-Thread

1,357 posts in this topic

On 22/05/2018 at 1:26 AM, onacloudynight said:

@herghly Just get used to the weird stuff. Get to the point where it just becomes completely normal and it doesn't bother you anymore. It is just another phenomenon, no different from any other phenomenon. It is all in the meaning that you assign to it.

Some examples of weird stuff happening from my own experience:

  • Speaking in tongues, chanting nonsensical words.
  • Involuntary vocalizations, yelling, screaming, laughing, growling etc....
  • Feeling of intense energy and power coursing through my body. Feels like electricity is coursing through my body Feeling like I am going to explode.
  • Feeling blood being pumped throughout my body. (Felt very weird)
  • Involuntary body movements, spontaneous mudras and asanas, basically the body just moves on its own. Feels like your possessed (This happens the most for me, but happens so often where now I am just used to it)
  • Spitting on the floor randomly during meditation.
  • Behaving like an animal, feelings of wanting to ravage something. (The key is not to act on any of these feeling, but to just mindfully observe them as they arise)
  • Becoming aware of my shadow.

Basically with all this stuff, you just need to relax into it and accept it, be mindful of all of it, without any resistance. Be a detached observer. Don't react to any of it. That is your mind's game is to get you to react to all of this stuff. This stuff is perfectly normal and is actually a really good sign of growth. You are purifying a lot of shit from your unconscious mind, but all you can see are these outward manifestations. 

If you haven't watched Leo's dark side of meditation video, I would highly recommend it. There he goes in-depth and covers all the possible weird stuff that can happen while doing these type of practices.

 

This makes me excited! Right now i do 30-40 minutes of kriya then  30 minutes of noting and labeling ... i am thinking now to just do 1 hour of kriya

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone experiencing anxiety (probably mixed with worry and fear) due to the kriya yoga practice?

I practice on and off before and noticed something similar, now i am practicing everyday (one week but as i practiced before, i am in lesson 6 or 7) and on the last two days i am feeling so much anxiety that is making praticaly impossiple to focus (i need to read and study everyday). I read about it in a book (about kundalini in Leo's list) and it says that due to the gradual kundalini awakening (it doesn't have to be something sudden and dramatic as most people believe) and its interaction with the chakras, thus amplifying everything (good or bad). I noticed that most spiritual practiced has this effect in my after i did a 10-day vipassana retreat last year. I realy need someone experienced in this but i cant find anyone in my area (i live in Brazil). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you into Kriya, I would highly recommend that in addition to reading the original Kriya book I suggested, you also read the books of Santata Gamana. I now prefer his more simplified techniques. It's a much more streamlined version of Kriya which I think will be even more effective. I found too much needless complexity and variety in the other way.

Right now my technique stack is very simple:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x24
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire x3
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 5 mins

Eventually, with lots of practice, you should aim for something like the following stack:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x36-x72
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire for 10-20 mins
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 10-20 mins
  5. (Bonus: Yoni Mudra x3)
  6. (Bonus: Kechari mudra)

EDIT: ideally, do this stack twice per day. But if you don't have that much time, at least once per day.

Don't attempt to do this second stack right off the bat. It will not be sustainable. You need to gradually build up to it, like with heavy weightlifting.

I think the original book I recommended is still very good as an introduction and foundation because Gamana's books are so short and thin that they do not provide enough information about Kriya to a total newbie. They are aimed at people who have already been initiated in one school or another.

If you are strictly following the original book, that is okay. You can keep doing that if you want. Or you could switch to this more streamlined version like I decided to do. I don't like learning too many complicated techniques. But that's just me. Both ways should work in the end. It's mostly a matter of style. Although I actually think the streamlined version will end up to be more effective because it concentrates your limited time on the most powerful techniques, and less time is wasted on learning new complex techniques.


"Be melting snow. Wash yourself of yourself." -- Rumi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Leo Gura said:

For those of you into Kriya, I would highly recommend that in addition to reading the original Kriya book I suggested, you also read the books of Santata Gamana. I now prefer his more simplified techniques. It's a much more streamlined version of Kriya which I think will be even more effective. I found too much needless complexity in the other way.

Right now my technique stack is very simple:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x24
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire x3
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 5 mins

Eventually you should aim for something like the following stack:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x36-x72
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire for 10-20 mins
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 10-20 mins
  5. (Bonus: Yoni Mudra x3)
  6. (Bonus: Kechari mudra)

I think the original book I recommended is still very good as an introduction and foundation because Gamana's books so short and thin that they do not provide enough information about Kriya to a total newbie. They are aimed at people who have already been initiated in one school or another.

Welcome back :D

First one. Boom!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Leo Gura said:

For those of you into Kriya, I would highly recommend that in addition to reading the original Kriya book I suggested, you also read the books of Santata Gamana. I now prefer his more simplified techniques. It's a much more streamlined version of Kriya which I think will be even more effective. I found too much needless complexity in the other way.

Right now my technique stack is very simple:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x24
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire x3
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 5 mins

Eventually you should aim for something like the following stack:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x36-x72
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire for 10-20 mins
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 10-20 mins
  5. (Bonus: Yoni Mudra x3)
  6. (Bonus: Kechari mudra)

I think the original book I recommended is still very good as an introduction and foundation because Gamana's books so short and thin that they do not provide enough information about Kriya to a total newbie. They are aimed at people who have already been initiated in one school or another.

Yooo!! Welcome back dude!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Leo Gura said:

For those of you into Kriya, I would highly recommend that in addition to reading the original Kriya book I suggested, you also read the books of Santata Gamana. I now prefer his more simplified techniques. It's a much more streamlined version of Kriya which I think will be even more effective. I found too much needless complexity and variety in the other way.

Right now my technique stack is very simple:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x24
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire x3
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 5 mins

Eventually, with lots of practice, you should aim for something like the following stack:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x36-x72
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire for 10-20 mins
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 10-20 mins
  5. (Bonus: Yoni Mudra x3)
  6. (Bonus: Kechari mudra)

Don't attempt to do this second stack right off the bat. It will not be sustainable. You need to gradually build up to it, like with heavy weightlifting.

I think the original book I recommended is still very good as an introduction and foundation because Gamana's books are so short and thin that they do not provide enough information about Kriya to a total newbie. They are aimed at people who have already been initiated in one school or another.

If you are strictly following the original book, that is okay. You can keep doing that if you want. Or you could switch to this more streamlined version like I decided to do. I don't like learning too many complicated techniques. But that's just me. Both ways should work in the end. It's mostly a matter of style. Although I actually think the streamlined version will end up to be more effective because it concentrates your limited time on the most powerful techniques, and less time is wasted on learning new complex techniques.

IT'S ALIIVE hahaha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Pernani said:

IT'S ALIIVE hahaha

Not entirely;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this dude just came back from 30 days of meditation and he comes back to casually write his daily comments as if nothing has changed. Hahaha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, thehero said:

this dude just came back from 30 days of meditation and he comes back to casually write his daily comments as if nothing has changed. Hahaha

After 30 days of being god, he comes back and is probably thinking "Ok how much did you good off you assholes"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Leo Gura said:

For those of you into Kriya, I would highly recommend that in addition to reading the original Kriya book I suggested, you also read the books of Santata Gamana. I now prefer his more simplified techniques. It's a much more streamlined version of Kriya which I think will be even more effective. I found too much needless complexity and variety in the other way.

Right now my technique stack is very simple:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x24
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire x3
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 5 mins

Eventually, with lots of practice, you should aim for something like the following stack:

  1. Mahamudra x3
  2. Kriya Pranayama x36-x72
  3. Kriya Supreme Fire for 10-20 mins
  4. One-pointed Concentration for 10-20 mins
  5. (Bonus: Yoni Mudra x3)
  6. (Bonus: Kechari mudra)

Don't attempt to do this second stack right off the bat. It will not be sustainable. You need to gradually build up to it, like with heavy weightlifting.

I think the original book I recommended is still very good as an introduction and foundation because Gamana's books are so short and thin that they do not provide enough information about Kriya to a total newbie. They are aimed at people who have already been initiated in one school or another.

If you are strictly following the original book, that is okay. You can keep doing that if you want. Or you could switch to this more streamlined version like I decided to do. I don't like learning too many complicated techniques. But that's just me. Both ways should work in the end. It's mostly a matter of style. Although I actually think the streamlined version will end up to be more effective because it concentrates your limited time on the most powerful techniques, and less time is wasted on learning new complex techniques.

But would you perform the Kriya Pranayama 1, 2 or 3  as the J.C. Stevens book discribes ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mart said:

But would you perform the Kriya Pranayama 1, 2 or 3  as the J.C. Stevens book discribes ?

I do a mix of Pranayama 2 + the Pranayama described in Gamana's book.

You can play around with different versions, the essence is the same. I like to visualize energy flowing up the spine to the very top of the head through all the charkas. I think the more precise your visualization gets, the better.

Gamana says not to visualize the energy flowing up each chakra, but I feel it's more powerful to visualize it. I find that doing a detailed visualization also helps stabilize and focus the monkey mind.

Experiment around and see what works best for you.


"Be melting snow. Wash yourself of yourself." -- Rumi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Leo Gura said:

I do a mix of Pranayama 2 + the Pranayama described in Gamana's book.

You can play around with different versions, the essence is the same. I like to visualize energy flowing up the spine to the very top of the head through all the charkas. I think the more precise your visualization gets, the better.

Gamana says not to visualize the energy flowing up each chakra, but I feel it's more powerful to visualize it. I find that doing a detailed visualization also helps stabilize and focus the monkey mind.

Experiment around and see what works best for you.

But you basically told us in the don't half-ass yoga video that experimenting isn't quite an option because those techniques were designed by spiritual geniuses.

I understand that there is on the other side the whole intuition aspect and you should practice and "feel" what works for you but the balance between both is very tricky.

I don't feel like innovating spiritual yoga techniques is exactly clever if you don't have a LOT of experience, like yoga training and studied a lot of different yogic schools. Which maybe you did :P

Just curious about how you handled this balance/paradox thingy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. An update version of how to do real Yoga would benefit many of us I guess.


What's the difference between a duck?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Lynnel said:

But you basically told us in the don't half-ass yoga video that experimenting isn't quite an option because those techniques were designed by spiritual geniuses.

I understand that there is on the other side the whole intuition aspect and you should practice and "feel" what works for you but the balance between both is very tricky.

I don't feel like innovating spiritual yoga techniques is exactly clever if you don't have a LOT of experience, like yoga training and studied a lot of different yogic schools. Which maybe you did :P

Just curious about how you handled this balance/paradox thingy.

Yes, it's a bit paradoxical.

I like to experiment and tinker with stuff and do things my way. I accept the risks.

For newbies I suggest you pick a book/school and stick with it.

I don't think the differences between the two books is as great as it might seem. It's variations on the same basic thing. There are dozens of schools of yoga because in practice, people end up making tweaks and variations to suit themselves.

Because most yoga is taught dogmatically, many schools sorta lie to their students that "You must do it perfectly the way I teach it, or it will not work". But this seems obviously false since there are many different masters from many different schools. So there's clearly some degree of leeway. The question is, when have you taken it too far? And that cannot be easily answered. You will only know by trail and error.


"Be melting snow. Wash yourself of yourself." -- Rumi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now