Vision

How to reduce cortisol levels when you have high cortisol?

14 posts in this topic

So I got my blood test results back.

Turns out I have very high cortisol. This may be adding to the fatigue I’ve been feeling 24/7.

How can I fix this issue? 

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Posted (edited)

More carbs. At least, that's the primary driver of lowering cortisol levels.

At least 125g per day.

Edited by The0Self

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12 hours ago, Vision said:

How can I fix this issue? 

Was the cortisol measured through blood sample or saliva sample? 

How many samples did they take? At what time of the day? Were you fasted when the sample was taken? 

 


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@The0Self Can I see sources? Not that I don’t believe you, just want more information on it.

 

3 minutes ago, Michael569 said:

Was the cortisol measured through blood sample or saliva sample? 

How many samples did they take? At what time of the day? Were you fasted when the sample was taken? 

It was measured through blood (injection). It was a serum cortisol test. I haven’t done a saliva cortisol test.

 

It was once, in the morning. I was fasted.

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2 hours ago, Vision said:

It was measured through blood (injection). It was a serum cortisol test. I haven’t done a saliva cortisol test.

It could be that your cortisol receptors in hypothalamus (executive hormonal centre in brain) & amygdala (emotional region)  have downregulated due to prolonged chronic stress and so there is no more cortisol hanging around the body (has nowhere to go). This is a natural adaptation to prolonged stress. It could simply be an indication that your body has been experiencing mild levels of stress for a very long time and it needs to be managed

Since this is no a salivary but serum cortisol, this is extremely tightly controlled in the body so I don't think it means that there is too much of it, what is probably happening is simply that the feedback loop in the amygdala -> hypothalamus - adrenals axis is not working 100% and your brain has become slightly cortisol resistant (this can be addressed through stress- reduction) 

Long story short: you need to start a very regular and rigorous meditative practice and doing some serious relaxation exercises :D All sources of stress need to be looked into as well 

 


MY WEBSITE  I help young ambitious men who struggle with chronic health problems to awaken their mind & body, to get well and to get aligned with their passion. DM me if you'd like to chat about how I can help you. 

MEN'S HEALTH GROUPCome join us to learn cool new things about health, nutrition and wellbeing.

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3 hours ago, Vision said:

Can I see sources? Not that I don’t believe you, just want more information on it.

It won't be too hard to find. That's just off the top of my head from knowing some of the primary hormonal pathways.

For instance, you could even start here:

https://www.google.com/search?q=carbs+and+cortisol

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"Beyond fear, destiny awaits" - Dune

 

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Posted (edited)

Im mr cortisol and im telling what i've done.

Rhodiola in the morning, ashwagandha in the evening. Magnesium bisclicinate before bed and after waking up. Phospatidylserine with a meal.

these are the top supplements for lowering cortisol.

I discovere I had high cortisol when trying intermitent fasting. This is not for us, because fasting increases cortisol, we need to take a bit of carbs every 3 hours.

take care.

Edited by Rajneeshpuram

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Also, if you're going to do meditation, remember that for some people it can actually be re-traumatizing and make things more stressful.  I think that was/is the case for me.  Often if I meditate I'll get lots of tightness in my gut and chest and my right jaw will clamp down so hard.

Here's a link to help navigate this particular issue of stress inducing meditation.

https://davidtreleaven.com/  = trauma sensitive mindfulness.


"Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down"   --   Marry Poppins

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10 hours ago, Michael569 said:

It could be that your cortisol receptors in hypothalamus (executive hormonal centre in brain) & amygdala (emotional region)  have downregulated due to prolonged chronic stress and so there is no more cortisol hanging around the body (has nowhere to go). This is a natural adaptation to prolonged stress. It could simply be an indication that your body has been experiencing mild levels of stress for a very long time and it needs to be managed

Since this is no a salivary but serum cortisol, this is extremely tightly controlled in the body so I don't think it means that there is too much of it, what is probably happening is simply that the feedback loop in the amygdala -> hypothalamus - adrenals axis is not working 100% and your brain has become slightly cortisol resistant (this can be addressed through stress- reduction) 

Long story short: you need to start a very regular and rigorous meditative practice and doing some serious relaxation exercises :D All sources of stress need to be looked into as well 

 

This makes a lot of sense. I had been on a grind for 2 years without any relaxation prior to this happening. 

I used to be able to meditate and do yoga every day, but ever since my health has been like this, I've had anxiety and depression 24/7. Can't enjoy anything, can't focus or concentrate on anything, takes 10000x more effort to do simple tasks, even on things I usually enjoy. Something must be off with my neurotransmitter production. 

If I sit still to meditate, it is extremely emotionally exhausting, it's like the anxiety comes at full force. I also feel physiologically uncomfortable, my gut wrenches up and my body becomes tense. 

I usually am a hardworking person but now I am the complete opposite, the constant fatigue and headache make it feel like my head is about to explode from how much pressure there is.

It's hard to explain with words. I couldn't even imagine feeling this terrible before it happened, this can only be experienced. 

 

@The0Self

Thanks!

 

@Arthur I have watched that, thanks :) 

 

6 hours ago, Rajneeshpuram said:

Im mr cortisol and im telling what i've done.

Rhodiola in the morning, ashwagandha in the evening. Magnesium bisclicinate before bed and after waking up. Phospatidylserine with a meal.

these are the top supplements for lowering cortisol.

I discovere I had high cortisol when trying intermitent fasting. This is not for us, because fasting increases cortisol, we need to take a bit of carbs every 3 hours.

take care.

Yes, I've seen those supplements being recommended by many sources. 

 

When you were intermittent fasting, were you on a ketogenic diet or a normal diet? 

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I've read that:

If your body is running on glucose and you are on a low-carb diet, this will increase cortisol levels as your body tries to make up for the lack of energy (glucose). 

If your body is running on ketones and you are on a low-carb diet, this will not increase cortisol as your body has an abundance of ketones to use for energy. 

So it would initially feel bad until you are keto-adapted. 

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5 hours ago, Matt23 said:

Also, if you're going to do meditation, remember that for some people it can actually be re-traumatizing and make things more stressful.  I think that was/is the case for me.  Often if I meditate I'll get lots of tightness in my gut and chest and my right jaw will clamp down so hard.

Here's a link to help navigate this particular issue of stress inducing meditation.

https://davidtreleaven.com/  = trauma sensitive mindfulness.

Thank you! This would be perfect for my case as I've been really uncomfortable doing meditation and yoga since this occured. 

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@Vision He's got a book too that people like Daniel Ingram, Michael Taft,  and other meditation masters/teachers recommend.  

One tip I got was, if doing body scanning, to not focus on the area of the body where those difficult emotions lie.  So, if you get fears in your chest, focus on the feet or nose.  For me, focusing on the feet, legs, and butt can give me a sense of groundedness.


"Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down"   --   Marry Poppins

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11 minutes ago, Matt23 said:

@Vision He's got a book too that people like Daniel Ingram, Michael Taft,  and other meditation masters/teachers recommend.  

One tip I got was, if doing body scanning, to not focus on the area of the body where those difficult emotions lie.  So, if you get fears in your chest, focus on the feet or nose.  For me, focusing on the feet, legs, and butt can give me a sense of groundedness.

^^

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