Jannes

Is jogging fun?

29 posts in this topic

Just got curious about it. I think I never had a runners high but is that a good experience. Also is it healthy? I am genetically terrible at sprinting but great at jogging but never made something out of it. 

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I find it fun. Running is considered healthy, and the runners high is great, especially when you've built on your fitness.

Edited by Thought Art

 "Unburdened and Becoming" - Bon Iver

                            ◭"89"

                  

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No, it's pointless and just annoying unless you have a wacky brain lol.

Basically the worst sport.


If you dont understand, you're not twisted enough.

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I have fond memories of jogging with my  father. I’d love to go out on a jog with him again soon!


“Within the garden of your mind, every thought is a seed that can bloom into a galaxy of wonders." -ChatGPT 4

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While listening to my favorite music I find it ecstatic at times.
 

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7 hours ago, Kksd74628 said:

@Jannes

Does ice cream taste good?

Yeah. What do you want to demonstrate?

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Jogging is one of the strengths of the human physiology. Unless you have certain physical problems, you could theoretically jog for extreme distances compared to most animals despite animals being faster.

I have a structural weakness which leads to pains if I jog a lot, otherwise I would do it a lot more.

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the constant pounding destroys your body specially your knees

stick to cycling

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6 hours ago, gettoefl said:

the constant pounding destroys your body specially your knees

stick to cycling

Exactly.

For cardiovascular work, my personal advice would be either of the two ends of the spectrum, but not in the middle. In other words, I would opt for either walking or HIIT on an exercise bike, but not moderate intensity steady state cardio, if my goal was health optimization.

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7 hours ago, gettoefl said:

the constant pounding destroys your body specially your knees

stick to cycling

1 hour ago, Jason Actualization said:

Exactly.

For cardiovascular work, my personal advice would be either of the two ends of the spectrum, but not in the middle. In other words, I would opt for either walking or HIIT on an exercise bike, but not moderate intensity steady state cardio, if my goal was health optimization.

You mind giving us some data that running damages your knees?


MD. Internal medicine/gastroenterology - Evidence based integral health approaches

"Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love."
- Rainer Maria Rilke

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7 hours ago, undeather said:

You mind giving us some data that running damages your knees?

after 23 years of running my knee cartilage is much reduced and legs in poor shape, running on pavement and track was the culprit, even had i run on softer surfaces damage would be significant, body is not designed for constantly being smacked at speed, these vibrations greatly stress the body, cycling is zero impact, this is just my experience

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1 hour ago, gettoefl said:

after 23 years of running my knee cartilage is much reduced and legs in poor shape, running on pavement and track was the culprit, even had i run on softer surfaces damage would be significant, body is not designed for constantly being smacked at speed, these vibrations greatly stress the body, cycling is zero impact, this is just my experience

Yes, cycling is definitely lower impact - and to be fair, I do know some people who experienced similar complaints (like yours) after years of running. That said, I also know some guys, marathon runners, who have perfect knee health - even after multiple years/decades and thousands of kilometers. I am also an avid runner and my knees are perfectly fine.

Hmmm, it's not really my area of expertise - so I can't even say what the reserach is saying about that!
But I know exactly who to contact - I will ask him and share what he says.

Edited by undeather

MD. Internal medicine/gastroenterology - Evidence based integral health approaches

"Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love."
- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Jogging your memory of how you came into being can be fun. No need to rush the process. Savor every moment of it! At this point you’re no longer trying to get from point A to point B… you are the journey and destination itself ^_^

For a less “spiritual” answer, yes, any type of movement and exercise are healthy ways of exploring yourself. Even if you have no legs.

 

Edited by Yimpa

“Within the garden of your mind, every thought is a seed that can bloom into a galaxy of wonders." -ChatGPT 4

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After some light research, it seems like running does not cause knee problems. In fact it helps improve the knees. Running related injury tends to come from overuse.

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11 hours ago, undeather said:

That said, I also know some guys, marathon runners, who have perfect knee health - even after multiple years/decades and thousands of kilometers. I am also an avid runner and my knees are perfectly fine.

Similar to how some folks can get away with smoking for decades, while others cannot. To be fair, I think a better question would be whether or not you know of folks who have been strictly cycling for years/decades without running, who encountered knee problems down the road.

If one has enough pieces of a puzzle assembled, they can logically deduce the rest of it prior to research coming to fruition. Low impact forms of cardio such as walking, or if looking to improve VO2 max by training in higher heart rate zones, things like swimming or cycling are absolutely advantageous.

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35 minutes ago, Jason Actualization said:

Similar to how some folks can get away with smoking for decades, while others cannot. To be fair, I think a better question would be whether or not you know of folks who have been strictly cycling for years/decades without running, who encountered knee problems down the road.

If one has enough pieces of a puzzle assembled, they can logically deduce the rest of it prior to research coming to fruition. Low impact forms of cardio such as walking, or if looking to improve VO2 max by training in higher heart rate zones, things like swimming or cycling are absolutely advantageous.

That's right, anecdotes can prove any side of an arugment. That's why we need to look at the research. I tend to agree with you that cycling and especially swimming are propably one of the most joint-sparing exercises available. Fun fact: Professional cyclist are more likely to suffer from low bone density issues (even mainfest osteoporisis) because of the extremely low impact of the movement-pattern: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/#:~:text=What the Research Shows,up with age and training.

I talked with my friend Brady Holmer about this issue - he holds a masters degree in human performance and is an endurance athlete himself. He publishes a blog called "Physiologically speaking", which is a great source of medical infromation for anyone intersted. Here is what he had to say: 


"Most of the evidence indicates that running is NOT harmful for long term knee health/arthritis/knee pain. In fact, runners tend to report healthier knees. Of course, there are runners who will struggle with knee pain. But if someone were to ask me if I’d avoid running for the fear of developing knee pain, I’d say no. There’s not much evidence that it will *cause* knee pain if you don’t already have it."

Edited by undeather

MD. Internal medicine/gastroenterology - Evidence based integral health approaches

"Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love."
- Rainer Maria Rilke

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22 hours ago, undeather said:

Professional cyclist are more likely to suffer from low bone density issues (even mainfest osteoporisis) because of the extremely low impact of the movement-pattern: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why-cycling-is-bad-for-bone-density-and-how-you-can-improve-it/#:~:text=What the Research Shows,up with age and training.

From the article, "When muscles contract they pull on the bones to which they are connected. These forces provide the stimulus for bones to grow both thicker and denser. Maximal strength training and impact forces are the best way to provide this stimulus to your bones."

My advice for anyone serious about their health is to make at least 80% of their exercise resistance training, the other 20%, or less, low-impact cardio, giving you the best of both worlds (optimal bone and cartilage formation courtesy of a controlled set of weight-bearing exercises, while getting the cardio benefits in an equally controlled, low impact fashion). Professional cyclists are optimizing for one incredibly specific domain, and their propensity to suffer osteoporotic outcome is unsurprising given the unidimensional nature of their training, which I would never suggest one emulate.

 

22 hours ago, undeather said:

"Most of the evidence indicates that running is NOT harmful for long term knee health/arthritis/knee pain. In fact, runners tend to report healthier knees. Of course, there are runners who will struggle with knee pain. But if someone were to ask me if I’d avoid running for the fear of developing knee pain, I’d say no. There’s not much evidence that it will *cause* knee pain if you don’t already have it."

Context is everything my friend. Here's the problem: the runners being studied have very low body mass indices. This demolishes the external validity of these studies, because most folks are overweight, and if you were to blindly advise them to run regularly, that would be ill-advised.

My BMI is around 28 and yet my body fat percentage is lower than these so-called "healthy" runners who are in fact skinny fat individuals who, invariably, will be more susceptible to sarcopenia later in life. That said, even though my "high" BMI is due to muscle mass, running would still put unwanted wear and tear on my joints and tendons, just as it would someone who is overweight due to excess adiposity.

The bottom line is that, jogging/running is simply one tool in the toolbox, but is in no way a linchpin given the several aforementioned, superior options.

Edited by Jason Actualization
Making it more concise.

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if im activley boxingi got my music in and im bumping ready to knock out my opponent and visualising the crowd going wild running is like cocaine to me, if im not boxing however and i gotta force myself to doit ITS THE WORST! i dont run as hard or as long, just being honest david goggins can take this one, whatever

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Probs depends on your personality type imo.

i fucking despise jogging. i need some kind of physical  activity that requires engaging my mind, like a sport. But maybe someone else  enjoys it for another reason. 


Be-Do-Have

Made it out the inner hood

There is no failure, only feedback

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