Yarco

Anti-anxiety Medication - Worth It?

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I've always been pretty against the idea of taking medication for things like anxiety or depression. The idea of something changing something as foundational as the thoughts in my head seems pretty scary. (I'm guessing many people on the forum feel the same way.) It's also scary that you become dependent on many of them and need to wean off if you ever want to stop.

However recently my anxiety has been getting increasingly worse over the years, and now it's at a pretty debilitating point. I'm pretty much constantly feeling stressed, anxious, and wound up about just... pretty much everything. More things than not at this point.

In the past I've always rationalized that I'd rather just suffer and be my genuine self than change my brain chemistry. But now it's so bad that's not really true any more.

What's changing my mind and making me more open to the idea of medication -- My dog is super anxious and scared of fireworks and thunder, so we talked to the vet and decided to put him on anxiety meds for the summer. (He's on Fluoxetine aka Prozac, same thing people take just at a lower dose.) I've noticed a big improvement in his temperament and anxiety, it's really significantly changed him for the better and made him a calmer and happier dog.

So I wonder if I should give meds a try myself and take the edge off for a while so I can just relax for once.

Most likely my doctor is going to put me on an SSRI like Sertraline though. And with the recent study about serotonin and depression I don't know what to think about that.

If anybody's had experiences, either good or bad, on specific medications, let me know.

Or if you have any other ideas or suggestions, maybe something more natural like ashwaganda or something, let me know.

I don't know if therapy would help. I feel like my anxiety is so bad that it's able to rationalize pretty much anything. And of course I'm super anxious about the idea of getting a therapist and talking to someone new about something so personal. Plus I've heard from more people than not what a struggle it was to find a good therapist, it sounds like most people go through like 5 on average before they find one they like.

Also with the whole personal development thing, I feel like I know myself better than most people and can pretty much self-therapize myself better than an outside person, if I just had the right questions to ask myself and contemplate. So if you know any kind of online course or worksheets for anxiety that you'd recommend, I would be very interested in those. I've tried free CBT for anxiety offered online by the UK or AUS government but it was boring and too theoretical.

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Posted (edited)

Totally worth it .I take :

Zyprexa

Prozac

Invega

Few months ago I suffered from extreme anxiety and depression and panic attacks. 

Now after taking these medications for a few months I feel totally different and the anxiety and mood swings have completely vanished 

 

Edited by Someone here

all that matters is the quality of the present moment. Because that's all there is to reality. A present Moment 😇

 

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25 minutes ago, Someone here said:

Totally worth it .I take :

Zyprexa

Prozac

Invega

Few months ago I suffered from extreme anxiety and depression and panic attacks. 

Now after taking these medications for a few months I feel totally different and the anxiety and mood swings have completely vanished 

 

Congrats dude!

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18 hours ago, Yarco said:

What's changing my mind and making me more open to the idea of medication -- My dog is super anxious and scared of fireworks and thunder, so we talked to the vet and decided to put him on anxiety meds for the summer. (He's on Fluoxetine aka Prozac, same thing people take just at a lower dose.) I've noticed a big improvement in his temperament and anxiety, it's really significantly changed him for the better and made him a calmer and happier dog.

Wtf. I never knew they gave these medications to pets too???


Don't wait for things to get better. Take proactive action.

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On 7/28/2022 at 10:11 AM, Yarco said:

maybe something more natural

Weed

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6 hours ago, Arcangelo said:

Weed

Hell no it gives me terrible depersonalization / derealization lol

I wish I could use it to get some relief. But even if I could, it wouldn't be good to be stoned all day every day. At that point it'd be basically the same as becoming an alcoholic to cure my anxiety. It might work but the downsides would outweigh the benefit.

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Posted (edited)

try tryptophan it's very effective for me. I take 200mg, but if i take double that i'm falling sleep standing up from relaxation. 

Tryptophan is a dietary supplement, its not medication. 

Edited by integral

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Posted (edited)

I will give a pretty straightforward answer to this.

Anxiety and depression medicines are pretty much used interchangeably throughout the medical community. Other than some chemical differences, they have the same fundamentals. The basic premise is that the medicines artificially create positive neurotransmitters in our brain, while blocking the negative neurotransmitters. 

 

There are 2 types of depression-

 

1. Clinical depression- This is the hardcore one. It usually involves a genetic factor and is by birth/childhood. You have to take medicines in it. There is no choice. Functioning without medicines is virtually impossible for such a person. He/she can't really worry about brain damage, since it is already damaged. Of course more damage will be worse, but at least the person will feel good, which is ultimately what matters. The good news is, this is super-rare. So most people don't have this. 

 

2. Non clinical or "normal" depression- This is the more common one. According to my estimate, 1 in every 3 persons is depressed, or atleast suffering from anxiety. Even many of the people who think and look like they are happy- they are depressed as well. The depression is just covered up with career, wealth, parties, pleasures, etc. This depression is highly situation-dependent in nature.

Broke? Depressed. Got a job? Happy.

Have some chronic ailments? Depressed. Got cured? Happy.

And many more things. One thing to note is, this depression is also a behavioral problem. Certain behaviours tend to increase this, and certain other behaviours alleviate this. Eg- exercise, eating good satvic food, etc. helps. But lying around in your bed increases the problem. This is different from the clinical depression where no amount of behavioural changes will beat the depression, simply because your brain is incapable of generating neurotransmitters like a normal person's brain does. Behaviours will help, but ultimately you will have to take medicines.

So to take medicines or not, in the non-clinical depression? In my understanding, you should exhaust all options before going for long-term medication. And by all, I mean all. Medication should be your last, last resort. If all else fails, go for meds. Afterall, you have to feel good, by hook or by crook. There will be brain damage, but you will feel good. And you gotta feel good somehow.

 

Being happy with brain damage > Being depressed without brain damage

 

So you will die 10 years earlier. Who cares? Atleast you were reasonably happy while alive. But be careful, do not take this as an excuse to become lazy and not exhaust all options before moving on to this step. And you and me have no idea how many options are there. There is literally a truckload of options for each problem. You have to sift through each and every one through trial and error, until you find one that suits you. This can take years, or maybe even decades. Get ready for some hard, hard work.

 

Also, another case which I can think of is, a short-term high intensity depressive episode. Like a loved one's death. Or a shock. Or an accident, etc. In this case, if the person has become really really depressed and cannot even get up from the bed, meds are fine for a couple of months. Enough to get him stable enough to get his shit back together. After that, wean the meds off and he could become normal. Medicines below 3 months is alright. A person can take them for support during an exceedingly difficult circumstance, which is short-term in nature. But you gotta be really careful while taking these medicines for more than 3 months. That's when there are good chances of permanent brain damage. 

 

As far as my personal experience goes, I have taken antidepressants and sleeping pills from 2 psychiatrists. The 1st psychiatrist gave me 3 antidepressants and a sleeping pill, along with vitamin tablets. It wasn't a good experience. My stomach got super constipated and I had fever along with mild headache when I started the medicine. My mood started improving, but the side effects were not worth the mood improvement. So I left his medicines after 3 days. 

Another psychiatrist I went to was a more famous and a more expensive one. He was referred by my mother's colleague. He gave me sertraline, starting with an extremely low dosage-12.5mg. Then he increased the dose to 25mg. At 25mg, I started getting side effects. Runny nose, headache, and extreme stiffness in entire body. The side effects persisted for 3-5 days. After that, they vanished. But my mood wasn't still much improved. Then after 2 weeks, he increased it to 50mg. I got the side effects again, which vanished after 3 days. But this time my mood improved. A lot. I could sit still and talk to my family comfortably, after a long long time. My logical thought process wasn't distorted- I didn't become excessively positive. I could still see that this is all temporary support, not a permanent cure. But my mood was improved, so negative thoughts were less. 

I thought that I will stop thinking about my problem and leave it after taking the medicine. But it didn't happen. I didn't become an overly positive fool. Only thing is, negative thoughts had stopped because of my improved mood. Then I stopped the medicine after 2 months, because-

1. I knew that my root cause was different, and this medicine was just for temporary support. So I again started working on the root cause, without the medicine. The positive mood persisted approximately for a month even after leaving the medicine.

2. I didn't want permanent brain damage. 

 

Best regards,

Medhansh

Edited by Medhansh

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Do you have any hint as to what's triggering those anxieties? For me, for example a radical change of lifestyle that includes lack of sleep and a lot of stimulation can get me close to a panic attack. 

In terms of some natural remedies. You could try Chamomile extract. Doses up to 1200mg per day in split doses are safe. I took a deep dive into research on chamomile, feel free to look it up in my blog and evaluate if the magnitude of evidence is worth giving it a shot. Not driving traffic to the website just sharing a summarised review for simplicity. 

Aswaganadha that you hinted o could also help. I've got an article on that as well. I found ashwagandha to be very effective with sleep for people and the sort of night-time stress. It also seems to have that GABA-ergic effect that can calm people down without the weird side effects of things like benzos

Other than that looking at sleep patterns and stress patterns may be useful as well as the use of caffeine. Ofcourse anxieties can come from a feeling of being trapped and having one's values stepped all over by other people. 

And finally anxieties can be triggered by certain parts within us (the IFS method) that are subconsciously responding to threats that we do not even perceive with our conscious mind. I found the book "no bad parts" extremely useful in this exploration. 

Good luck with it!

 


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Posted (edited)

7 hours ago, Michael569 said:

Do you have any hint as to what's triggering those anxieties? For me, for example a radical change of lifestyle that includes lack of sleep and a lot of stimulation can get me close to a panic attack. 

It probably sounds like something an angsty teenager would say, but I feel like my anxiety stems from just living in a fundamentally sick and corrupt society. Living in a city with hundreds of thousands of people, no real connections or sense of community, isolated and don't feel like anyone around me has the same interests/beliefs as me, no one is on my side or looking out for me. Alone and vulnerable in a sea of people. (At the same time I'm introverted and anxious so it'd be hard to make connections even if I wanted to.)

At some level I think all of my anxieties are about people.... people being unpredictable, violent, increased crime, or just people being loud and obnoxious and inconsiderate. Worrying what people will think, say, or do.

My current cope is that if I could just move away from the big city I live in, and be on a couple acres away from everybody where I don't even have neighbors to worry about, and only need to go into a small town once a week to get groceries or something, then it would be a much less anxiety-filled life.

At some level I suspect this wouldn't work though. I have an extremely avoidant personality and go to pretty genius lengths to get myself out of situations that make me anxious. I made my own business to work from home so I wouldn't have to deal with the stress of taking a crowded bus to work every day, dealing with coworkers and work drama, having to talk on the phone, etc.

But all that tends to happen when I remove my bigger sources of anxiety, is that my level of anxiety just stays the same and I find smaller and smaller problems to be equally anxious about. So instead of worrying about a meeting at work I'm just worrying about what my neighbor thinks of me or something instead. PLUS it wears away the desensitization to everyday stressors, so where it was easier to go out and do stuff before, now it's extra anxiety-provoking to go to a mall or if I had to go back to riding a crowded bus.

If I moved to a place where I never saw people again, my anxiety would most likely shift onto something else like worrying about racoons or skunks on my property or something.

In terms of sleep I have no problems. I've always been out within 10 minutes of hitting the pillow. I have a baby now so there's more interruptions in the night, but I don't think it has really had an impact on my anxiety. Although I have started drinking caffeine in the past couple of years as a result and it'd probably help if I cut that out.

I will check out chamomile extract and ashwaganadha though, plus watch the IFS videos that Leo just posted on the blog. Thanks!

On 8/1/2022 at 11:51 AM, Medhansh said:

There are 2 types of depression-

1. Clinical depression- This is the hardcore one. It usually involves a genetic factor and is by birth/childhood. You have to take medicines in it. There is no choice. Functioning without medicines is virtually impossible for such a person. He/she can't really worry about brain damage, since it is already damaged. Of course more damage will be worse, but at least the person will feel good, which is ultimately what matters. The good news is, this is super-rare. So most people don't have this. 

2. Non clinical or "normal" depression- This is the more common one. According to my estimate, 1 in every 3 persons is depressed, or atleast suffering from anxiety. Even many of the people who think and look like they are happy- they are depressed as well. The depression is just covered up with career, wealth, parties, pleasures, etc. This depression is highly situation-dependent in nature.

I have what is probably the "normal" depression where I just feel less happy and motivated for months at a time, a slightly depressed state is pretty much my default state. Then rarely a few times a year, I'll get 1 - 2 weeks where I'm happier and have lots of energy and almost manic.

Then maybe 4x a year I'll have a period of 1 - 3 days in a row where it's severe depression where it's extra hard to do things, crying for no reason, etc. (But still not to the point that I can't get out of bed or shower, like the most severe cases I've heard of.)

On 8/1/2022 at 11:51 AM, Medhansh said:

Being happy with brain damage > Being depressed without brain damage

So you will die 10 years earlier. Who cares? Atleast you were reasonably happy while alive.

What are the long-term health risks of taking anti-anxiety or anti-depression meds? I did a quick Google search and didn't see any studies on brain damage. I saw something about 14% increased risk of cardiovascular issues.

Do you know how these meds negatively impact the body and cause brain damage? (especially SSRIs like sertraline, which is most likely what I would end up taking)

Is the increased mortality statistic maybe just skewed because depressed people are more likely to commit suicide or something like that?

Appreciate all your insight either way

Edited by Yarco

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I stay away from medication because it will never address the root cause and does not allow for true healing to occur. Being high in anxiety means that you are running in a constant fight/flight state. If possible, try reducing things that are adding to your stressed out state. 

Things such as reducing your work load just a little, if you workout, do gentle movements, slow walks, time in nature if possible, make it a priority to really truly rest (laying in bed scrolling doesn’t count), social media can add to anxiety, cut out all caffeine, you may need to change your diet (less sugar, more whole foods , healthy fats, quality meat). 
 


"You Create Magic" 

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Posted (edited)

22 hours ago, Yarco said:

 I have what is probably the "normal" depression where I just feel less happy and motivated for months at a time, a slightly depressed state is pretty much my default state. Then rarely a few times a year, I'll get 1 - 2 weeks where I'm happier and have lots of energy and almost manic.

Then maybe 4x a year I'll have a period of 1 - 3 days in a row where it's severe depression where it's extra hard to do things, crying for no reason, etc. (But still not to the point that I can't get out of bed or shower, like the most severe cases I've heard of.)

Yeah, that's a good enough evidence that you have problems with your mental health. Could you pinpoint to one exact thing which you could consider to be the root cause of your depression? Or maybe 2-3 major things?

Let me help you. Divide your life into 3 parts-

1. Health (this refers to physical health. Any chronic diseases, pains, short/long term infections, disorders, etc.) Do you have any of this? No need to get a medical diagnosis, you know your body better than any doctor. In short, do you have any bodily issues?

2. Wealth - Your career, life purpose, income, loan, debt, expenses, business, etc. This is pretty obvious. If you have gotten a stable, well-paying job that you don't despise, you're good. If you have a business that pays enough to sustain you, that's good enough. Bad things could be a job you hate, extremely low wage job, stressful business, black money, borderline illegal work, unemployment, etc.

3. Relationships- All blood and non-blood relations in your life. All people you interact with in your entire life. Are there any toxic people you want out of your life? A previous toxic relationship, bad childhood? This will also get you to the trauma rabbit hole, which you will need to work on if needed.

 

All in all, these 3 are the basic aspects of one's life. If these 3 are reasonably good, one has no reason to be depressed.

But don't get me wrong, even if currently everything is good, you might still suffer from depression from past incidents in your life. 

The above classification was an external one. 

 

Now let's see an internal classification.

This problem has 3 levels. Let us look at each one-

1. Body- If there are any problems at the level of our body, any chronic disease for example. And in body I am specifically talking about stomach. Stomach has a direct link with our mood as it is connected to the brain by the vagus nerve. Pay attention to whether your stomach is good or not, your colon should be cleaned naturally on a daily basis. So first step is to make the body(stomach) perfectly alright. Naturopathy and Ayurveda will help you here. Mainstream medicine (allopathy) isn't any good, unless you have an acute infection. Plus any other bodily issues should also be cleared out. 

2. Mind- Our entire psychological structure, consisting of our thoughts and beliefs. Our past experiences, traumas, beliefs, desires, etc. Work on your thought process. Note what type of thoughts you are getting. They should be normal, neither excessively negative nor excessively positive. A counselor or a clinical psychologist can help. Or you can watch videos of people who have a deep understanding of our mind and thoughts. Are there any negative thought patterns or loops which lead you to think negatively even in normal situations? Or on the opposite end of the spectrum, maybe you view every situation through a lens of excessive positivity. Fake positivity this is called. To avoid the pain of looking at life-situations as they are, you adopt a lens of excessive positivity. Both are dangerous. 

3. Brain- The physical, 1.5 kg organ sitting inside your skull. The problem on this level can be of neurotransmitters, or brain chemicals in simple language. If they are imbalanced, you will feel bad no matter how positive you think. This can happen due to- genetic reasons, accident, injury, etc. A psychiatrist will help you here. This is very rare.

 

If you have problem on all three levels, then you will have to work on all three together.

 

However, in 99% cases you will see that the depression will be cured as soon as you cure your stomach(or any other bodily problems), and work on your thought process. Only in rare cases you will have to go to the third level and take the help of a psychiatrist. 

 

Cure yourself in this order only, first your body, second your mind, and third your brain. 

 

So this is the detailed explanation man, read it thoroughly and observe yourself. Where are you lagging in terms of body, mind, and brain?

This is the entire internal game as far as depression is concerned.

Quote

What are the long-term health risks of taking anti-anxiety or anti-depression meds? I did a quick Google search and didn't see any studies on brain damage. I saw something about 14% increased risk of cardiovascular issues.

Do you know how these meds negatively impact the body and cause brain damage? (especially SSRIs like sertraline, which is most likely what I would end up taking)

Is the increased mortality statistic maybe just skewed because depressed people are more likely to commit suicide or something like that?

Appreciate all your insight either way

There are risks, a lot of them. I don't need to study any research since I have witnessed my father take antidepressants and sleeping pills for more than 10 years now. The long term effects are not good at all. He is completely dependent on these medicines for his mood and well-being. His sleep, hunger, mood, concentration, willpower, memory, socialization, work, etc.- everything is determined by these meds. He has tried to leave these medicines a lot of times. Some of them are relatively easy to leave. You will feel bad for 10-30 days, but then the brain adapts. But some others are impossible to leave. You will get such an extremely negative reaction from your brain each time you try to leave them, that you will be forced to start them again. I know atleast 2 such tablets that my father takes. The only way to leave these medicines is to find a way to make our brain release these chemicals naturally, without these medicines. And the longer you take them, the more difficult it gets. And even after taking these meds, there is a limit to their dosage and effect. After a while, you will start feeling low on a certain dosage. Then the doctor will increase the dose. Slowly you will reach the maximum safe dosage of a certain tablet. After which, your doctor will add another one. And another. And another. There was a time where my father was taking 8 tablets in one day. The doctor will also add multivitamins on top of that. After some years, you will reach the maximum safe dosage for all tablets. After which the doctor will tell you that this is it, he cannot increase the dosage from here onwards. Now he will tell you to work on your willpower, lifestyle, etc. in such a way that you somehow get through life with these fixed pills of fixed doses. 

Also, it's not necessary you will feel good even after all this. My father has a rotating mood slot of depression, anger, negativity, anxiety, etc. Very few times he gets positive. Even though he's taking all the prescribed meds for depression.

And the long-term effects of these meds will fuck up your thought process. For sure. Sometimes, my father shows the maturity of a 10-year old. 

Think about it. If it was possible to feel extra good with these pills, without any side-effects, everyone would be taking them. 

So that's that. Trade-offs are heavy here. Life-threatening even. Be extra careful. 

Edited by Medhansh

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15 hours ago, Yarco said:

It probably sounds like something an angsty teenager would say, but I feel like my anxiety stems from just living in a fundamentally sick and corrupt society. Living in a city with hundreds of thousands of people, no real connections or sense of community, isolated and don't feel like anyone around me has the same interests/beliefs as me, no one is on my side or looking out for me. Alone and vulnerable in a sea of people. (At the same time I'm introverted and anxious so it'd be hard to make connections even if I wanted to.)

At some level I think all of my anxieties are about people.... people being unpredictable, violent, increased crime, or just people being loud and obnoxious and inconsiderate. Worrying what people will think, say, or do.

My current cope is that if I could just move away from the big city I live in, and be on a couple acres away from everybody where I don't even have neighbors to worry about, and only need to go into a small town once a week to get groceries or something, then it would be a much less anxiety-filled life.

At some level I suspect this wouldn't work though. I have an extremely avoidant personality and go to pretty genius lengths to get myself out of situations that make me anxious. I made my own business to work from home so I wouldn't have to deal with the stress of taking a crowded bus to work every day, dealing with coworkers and work drama, having to talk on the phone, etc.

But all that tends to happen when I remove my bigger sources of anxiety, is that my level of anxiety just stays the same and I find smaller and smaller problems to be equally anxious about. So instead of worrying about a meeting at work I'm just worrying about what my neighbor thinks of me or something instead. PLUS it wears away the desensitization to everyday stressors, so where it was easier to go out and do stuff before, now it's extra anxiety-provoking to go to a mall or if I had to go back to riding a crowded bus.

If I moved to a place where I never saw people again, my anxiety would most likely shift onto something else like worrying about racoons or skunks on my property or something.

In terms of sleep I have no problems. I've always been out within 10 minutes of hitting the pillow. I have a baby now so there's more interruptions in the night, but I don't think it has really had an impact on my anxiety. Although I have started drinking caffeine in the past couple of years as a result and it'd probably help if I cut that out.

I will check out chamomile extract and ashwaganadha though, plus watch the IFS videos that Leo just posted on the blog. Thanks!

It actually sounds like something many of us on here feel. I think once you push yourself a little bit higher on the spiral and start becoming aware of the destructive behaviour and the path others are taking towards "happiness" if your empathy is high enough it will cause suffering and even disgust. 

But perhaps rather than isolating yourself there is a way to channel that into a mission or a vision? To help elevate other people in one way or another. In a way that is most meaningful. 

I have seen super high quality content from you on the forum and I know you have a lot to offer. That also would probably help with those anxieties for a few reasons

  1. you would feel in control because you are doing something to help 
  2. you would be honoring your values 
  3. rather than focus on what is wrong with the world and getting depressed by it you would be focusing on the solution and your mind would be occupied by your thing - otherwise it is easy to ruminate 

To give you a personal example, for me whenever I stop focusing on my work and start ruminating on why things are not working, how hard it is and how nobody cares about what I do and how this is never going to work, I can easily slide into feeling depressed. But when I am laser focused on the work and stop thinking about all the other shit, my mood elevates and my motivation follows. 

Ultimately one wants to trancend that and elevate themselves to the highest level of consciousness, but I am nowhere near a place where I would be ready to do that without burning through another karma first. 

Perhaps there is a karma that you need to burn through first as well :)

This is the most obvious question of all but have you tried the LP course? If so, did you finish it and got something out of it? 

P.S. Caffeine is a MAJOR source of anxiety triggers. The way it works is that if you are already stressed and tense, caffeine will give you a one-up and push you over the emotional threshold towards full blown panic attack. The effect may be delayed so the connection can be harder to make tho 


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maybe this is too obvious but it works for me, and I would try it before getting on medication(if you haven't tried it already):

Run. Run as far as you can, until you reach complete physical exhaustion. (perharps on a treadmill if you can't leave the house)

I think this always gives enough "neurochemical" relaxation. From that base I find easier to do more advanced stuff like meditation or doing therapy on myself with self-help materials, to get more persistent benefits.

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10 hours ago, Michael569 said:

But perhaps rather than isolating yourself there is a way to channel that into a mission or a vision? To help elevate other people in one way or another. In a way that is most meaningful.

Yeah this is a more long-term goal of mine once I accomplish my more short-term goals, to take on more of a mentor role, but not sure if I'm qualified or deserving of that yet.

I've also noticed that you can only help people who want to help themselves, which is pretty depressing on its own. "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink" situation.

For example I have a 25 year old cousin that just sits in his parents house all day smoking weed and playing video games, never had a job, doesn't even have the motivation to fill out paperwork to get disability/unemployment that he qualifies for, basically free money for almost no work. His parents are both in bad health and I'm almost certain he's going to become homeless in 10 or less years when they both die. I would love to help him get his s**t together before it's too late, but he has no interest in putting in any effort when he can just delay the consequences and coast for another 10 years.

It's maddening to see preventable train wrecks all around you but being powerless to stop them. I guess there are plenty of people online I could help but 1. I worry coaching is a lazy life purpose that lots of people default to because they see Leo doing it. 2. I don't want to beg people to let me help them. I have a youtube channel where I've done 50+ videos about writing (my life purpose) with goals that eventually I'd build an audience and I could sell a course for people who wanted to make a full-time living being a writer, but none of the videos got more than 100 views despite my SEO knowledge, good thumbnails, etc. I guess I don't want to invest hundreds of hours trying to help people and have nobody show up who wants to be helped.

10 hours ago, Michael569 said:

I think once you push yourself a little bit higher on the spiral and start becoming aware of the destructive behaviour and the path others are taking towards "happiness" if your empathy is high enough it will cause suffering and even disgust. 

I think you're definitely on to something here. I feel like I've had to strategically turn my empathy off or it would cripple my ability to do anything. I have to care for no one, or very few people. Otherwise it'd open the floodgates and I'd have to donate all the time and money I have to helping every starving kid in Africa, every kid and dog and cat that needs to be adopted.

10 hours ago, Michael569 said:

Perhaps there is a karma that you need to burn through first as well :)

Do you have any recommendations on how to identify karma, baggage that I need to burn through?

10 hours ago, Michael569 said:

This is the most obvious question of all but have you tried the LP course? If so, did you finish it and got something out of it? 

Yeah I'm a big proponent of the LP course and I actually go through the entire course again every December. It helped me to be sure that quitting my job to become a freelance writer was the right decision.

For about 4 years my life purpose was "Summarizing information in an easy-to-digest format and empowering people to pursue their dreams." I paid the bills by writing blogs and articles for sites that I considered ethical, and usually topics I was interested anyway. Then I created a few of my own blogs on the side.

This year I changed it slightly to "Explaining unique topics to people to create a sense of awe and wonder" because I wanted to include a podcast, I've recorded 44 episodes since February but getting a bit burned out on it now.

My top 3 values are 1. health/vigor/energy, 2. contribution/impact 3. freedom/independence

I might end up back on something like coaching with that eventually. If I could do something all day it'd be commenting on Forums/Reddit/etc and I seem to get good feedback for the comments and advice I leave. If I could create an advice column that might actually be my ideal purpose, but it seems like you'd need some kind of following or accomplishments before anyone would want your advice.

13 hours ago, narkuser said:

maybe this is too obvious but it works for me, and I would try it before getting on medication(if you haven't tried it already):

Run. Run as far as you can, until you reach complete physical exhaustion. (perharps on a treadmill if you can't leave the house)

I think this always gives enough "neurochemical" relaxation. From that base I find easier to do more advanced stuff like meditation or doing therapy on myself with self-help materials, to get more persistent benefits.

Yeah this is good advice and something I should be doing more. I was up to running nearly 5 km 3x a week before covid, but then I just stopped and never picked it up again. On the days that I ran my partner did say she noticed an improvement in my mood.

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@Yarco

On 28/7/2022 at 7:11 PM, Yarco said:

.

Most likely my doctor is going to put me on an SSRI like Sertraline though. And with the recent study about serotonin and depression I don't know what to think about that.

 

What does this recent study say? I'm very interested to know.

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Posted (edited)

I took anti anxiety medication for like 3 weeks and it was one of the worst experiences of my life. I became like a zombie. Basically i didn't feel much of anything. I didn't feel anxiety much but i also didn't feel much of anything else.

It was a very dull state of consciousness that i despised. I quickly weaned off the medication. I am very against medication unless they are super necessary.

From your post, it seems you haven't exhausted all other methods yet. My anxiety nowadays is very low level. I don't feed into anxiety by ruminating about it. And i accept the worst case scenario by being willing to experience everything.

 

Edited by SQAAD

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On 04/08/2022 at 1:27 AM, Yarco said:

I've also noticed that you can only help people who want to help themselves, which is pretty depressing on its own. "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink" situation.

yes exactly. You can only help someone who has come to you in need of help. It is pretty much impossible to help someone who resists your efforts to share advice. There is also the issue of power balance. In order for someone to accept your advice, in a way they need to let go of control a bit and become open minded. Not everyone is able to do that and when there is a power struggle between the client and the service provider, it is impossible to be of any use. I've had that happen to me a few times in my practice. 

The best clients I've had were the ones who were completely able to let go off their control and be fully open-minded and came to the therapeutic process 100% willing to do whatever it took to change their habits. But it is hard to do if one has a belief that letting go of control is dangerous. 

On 04/08/2022 at 1:27 AM, Yarco said:

I worry coaching is a lazy life purpose

maybe that's not the path for you. There are many other ways to take it. 

The best way to go about it is through some reflection and understanding what you actually enjoy doing the most and sharing with others the most. Like, if you were not paid, what is the one thing you would still be researching/doing.

What's the thing you get pulled towards the most when nobody is watching. 

And then the next step is to figure out how to market it - but I'm sure you would be able to do that as I've seen lot of good quality entrepreneurship type of content from you before. 

Don't let any negative thoughts (such as "nobody cares about it anyway" stop you from sharing your best work :) People care. Not all but some do. FInd them and help them. You don't need 1000s of clients and followers. You only need a few.  

On 04/08/2022 at 1:27 AM, Yarco said:

Do you have any recommendations on how to identify karma, baggage that I need to burn through?

I think this is individual process for everyone. But listening to your intuition and having some sort of reflective practice for insights you get in the day is a good way to get those hints. Your mind will tell you what you need to do, if you listen patiently. 

As a personal example, I use an app called Braintoss which I have linked with my Trello organiser.

Whenever I get a random insight or an idea in the day, I record a short voicemessage to Braintoss and it converts it to written message and it sends to my Trello Account as a "new task" so that I can look at it later during my review time.

If the insight is worth brainstorming on further, I open a new entry in Penzu and write about it. The beauty of writing (rather than thinking about is) is that it helps you to activate deeper regions of your prefrontal cortex that are hard to activate during rummination and it helps to shut down your limbic system (fear, anxieties, doubts) and give space to creativity, imagination and strategic planning.

 And so you get a high-altitude perspective rather than being in the midst of all the emotional turmoil that prevents you to see the tiny details. As the saying goes "you miss the forest for the trees"

But that may not work for you. It doesn't work for me always but it is the best system of capturing insights I have found so far. 

There are two books that were helpful with this. 

Cal Newports's Deep Work and Productivity Ninja by Graham Alcott. 

 

One more thing: I know this may not be relevant but also quality of your diet, lifestyle, activity (and lack thereof) and all these other, more biochemical factors, can have a profound impact on how well you can control anxieties and whether they come or not. 

Certain types of food may have a significant impact on mood, certain mienral deficiencies, imbalances or excesses of certain foods have been associated with depression in research. All of those are also worth looking into. 

Good luck with everything !


My Website
Cutting-Edge Nutritional Therapy and Lifestyle support. Men's Health. 
Energy Optimisation, Digestive Support, Cardiometabolic Health, Athletic Support, Mental Health, Hormones

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Posted (edited)

It took me several years of highly refining my diet and life style to get rid of a lot of the anxiety and depression I had. I found caffine to be a big source of anxiety for me. Weed was also a big issue. I eat all organic whole foods now. I make all of my own food as well. I have a list of about 10 foods that I cannot eat or I will get brain fog or other issues. I spent a lot of time slowly adding foods into my diet to really test what works best for me.

I found doing some heavy metal chelation was a bit helpful for my depersonalization issues I had for years. However, I would not really recommend that unless you have done some serious gut healing and really worked on your life style. 

I found doing regular meditation for years helped me as well. It seemed to take awhile though. 

Personally I never tried any of the medications. So I can't really say what is the most optimal there. 

Edited by Average Investor

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