ThePoint

Nothing seems to help my paranoia. I think I need professional help.

44 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, Mesopotamian said:

Hey have you tried experimenting with this? seems that it works for me

https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMNVgmnky/?k=1

@Mesopotamian

I know about the Vagus Nerve. I am currently reading a book about it by Wendy Hayden. 

I have yet to get any results from it. 

Edited by ThePoint

Don't wait for things to get better. Take proactive action.

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1 hour ago, Ulax said:

I understand you weren't asking me. But here is the most prominent directory of certified IFS practioners.

https://ifs-institute.com/practitioners

Thank you.


By the way, I did ask you in one of my other posts under this thread :)
 

Quote

Ah... there it is - Another IFS Therapy recommendation   

I've seen IFS Therapy being recommended so many times on this forum, it's time I actually try it. 

What is the best way to go about it? Read the books? Go to a IFS certified therapist? 

@Ulax What are your thoughts? 

 


Don't wait for things to get better. Take proactive action.

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2 minutes ago, ThePoint said:

Thank you.


By the way, I did ask you in one of my other posts under this thread :)
 

 

You're welcome.

Ah. I meant to reply. I'll do so now.

- What is the best way to go about it? Read the books? Go to a IFS certified therapist? @Ulax What are your thoughts? 

I haven't personally achieved my main goals in this area (IFS progress). So, I don't think I've achieved a level of mastery, with IFS, which would mean I could reliably say what the best way to go about it is.

However, I have done a lot of work with the model since the beginning of the year, and engaged with a lot of resources. So, I'll give you my recommendations based on my current understanding. I'd recommend you treat my words here not as advice, but rather the thoughts of a fellow traveller on the journey who has had some experience in an area you're interested in.

Here are my recommendations

1. Watch this introductory video.

What is IFS Therapy? | Intro to Internal Family Systems

2. Get the following audible: 'Greater than the sum of your parts' By Dr Richard Schwartz, and do the meditations as they come up

3. Get an IFS level 3 Therapist 

-- A. A level 3 IFS therapist refers to someone who is a licensed psychotherapist who has the highest current level of certification (level 3) from the IFS institute. Here is where I understand to be the best place to find them: https://ifs-institute.com/practitioners.

-- B. If an IFS level 3 therapist is not available, then I'd recommend getting a level 3 practioner. A level 3 practioner has the same level of certification from the institute but is not a licensed therapist.

-- C. If they are not available, look for level 2 therapists/ practioners. If they are not available, then look for level 1s.

-- D. I understand there to be not much lost by doing IFS online too, i.e. over zoom.

-- E. I recommend getting someone like this because of mentorship, and recommendations from experts. Firstly, here is an analogy. Let's say you wanted to learn to box. Would be better suited learning boxing better by reading books about it and training yourself, or have a world-class boxing coach regularly teaching you. Secondly, Jay Earley, to my mind, a master in the field, recommends you do IFS with someone else leading the session.

-- F. I'd recommend doing initial consultations with a few different therapists/ practioners and choose the one you like. Btw, if you have trouble with setting boundaries, i.e. telling a potential therapist you don't want to work with them, I'd recommend just not messaging them i.e. ghosting.

4. Learn each step of the IFS process through reading and doing the exercises in, 'Self Therapy (Vol. 1) Second edition' by Jay Earley.

- A. This is a pretty optional recommendation from me. I don't want to overburden you with resources. I have been going through this book slowly, just trying to improve each step of the process one by one. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All the best :).

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17 hours ago, Ulax said:

You're welcome.

Ah. I meant to reply. I'll do so now.

- What is the best way to go about it? Read the books? Go to a IFS certified therapist? @Ulax What are your thoughts? 

I haven't personally achieved my main goals in this area (IFS progress). So, I don't think I've achieved a level of mastery, with IFS, which would mean I could reliably say what the best way to go about it is.

However, I have done a lot of work with the model since the beginning of the year, and engaged with a lot of resources. So, I'll give you my recommendations based on my current understanding. I'd recommend you treat my words here not as advice, but rather the thoughts of a fellow traveller on the journey who has had some experience in an area you're interested in.

Here are my recommendations

1. Watch this introductory video.

What is IFS Therapy? | Intro to Internal Family Systems

2. Get the following audible: 'Greater than the sum of your parts' By Dr Richard Schwartz, and do the meditations as they come up

3. Get an IFS level 3 Therapist 

-- A. A level 3 IFS therapist refers to someone who is a licensed psychotherapist who has the highest current level of certification (level 3) from the IFS institute. Here is where I understand to be the best place to find them: https://ifs-institute.com/practitioners.

-- B. If an IFS level 3 therapist is not available, then I'd recommend getting a level 3 practioner. A level 3 practioner has the same level of certification from the institute but is not a licensed therapist.

-- C. If they are not available, look for level 2 therapists/ practioners. If they are not available, then look for level 1s.

-- D. I understand there to be not much lost by doing IFS online too, i.e. over zoom.

-- E. I recommend getting someone like this because of mentorship, and recommendations from experts. Firstly, here is an analogy. Let's say you wanted to learn to box. Would be better suited learning boxing better by reading books about it and training yourself, or have a world-class boxing coach regularly teaching you. Secondly, Jay Earley, to my mind, a master in the field, recommends you do IFS with someone else leading the session.

-- F. I'd recommend doing initial consultations with a few different therapists/ practioners and choose the one you like. Btw, if you have trouble with setting boundaries, i.e. telling a potential therapist you don't want to work with them, I'd recommend just not messaging them i.e. ghosting.

4. Learn each step of the IFS process through reading and doing the exercises in, 'Self Therapy (Vol. 1) Second edition' by Jay Earley.

- A. This is a pretty optional recommendation from me. I don't want to overburden you with resources. I have been going through this book slowly, just trying to improve each step of the process one by one. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All the best :).

@Ulax

Wow! So much value here man. Thank you so much for making such a detailed post! :) 

6 hours ago, Ulax said:

Oh yeah, I'd check this out too

https://integralguide.com/

Thank you so so much for showing me this! This looks amazing.


Don't wait for things to get better. Take proactive action.

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I’ve dealt with this for a long time. During times of stress in my life it was easier for me to be paranoid so be gentle with yourself if you’re going through some shit. Something one of my teachers presented to me is the idea of inquiry vs interrogation. Interrogating ourselves to get the answer is harsh and leads to more and more fears, in life it is better to have a gentle inquiry about things that come up. We don’t have all the answers and that is scary, and so to have a little “hm, I wonder what the answer to this could be?” is a much more kinder route. 


"You Create Magic" 

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9 minutes ago, Ulax said:

@Flowerfaeiry I thought you'd left the forum as you hadn't posted for a while

Miss me? 😘


"You Create Magic" 

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@Flowerfaeiry welcome back 🙏


My Website
Cutting-Edge Nutritional Therapy and Lifestyle support. Men's Health. 
Energy Optimisation, Digestive Support, Cardiometabolic Health, Athletic Support, Mental Health, Hormones

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5 hours ago, Carl-Richard said:

Wow, side by side, you literally have the same profile picture

that was, ofcourse, arranged in advance ^_^


My Website
Cutting-Edge Nutritional Therapy and Lifestyle support. Men's Health. 
Energy Optimisation, Digestive Support, Cardiometabolic Health, Athletic Support, Mental Health, Hormones

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@Michael569 What are your thoughts on paranoia?

23 hours ago, Ulax said:

I'd also recommend TRE. (Trauma release exercises).

https://www.trecourse.com/

Has short term and long term benefits.

@Ulax Thank you! Have you tried them? 


Don't wait for things to get better. Take proactive action.

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1 hour ago, ThePoint said:

@Michael569 What are your thoughts on paranoia?

Treatment of paranoia is not something I have direct experience with however I am sure it is not that different from just general anxiety about negative experiences. In a way, you could say paranoia is a fear of past negative experiences being repeated.

Our brains are really good at hardwiring negative experinces from our past and then always scanning the environment for the repetition of that experience. I would bet that this is one of the major causes of general anxieties and panic attacks. 

Rather than fighting it, you could see it as a protective mechanism that you have subconsciously developed (probably in childhood) to protect yourself from being harmed so now your brain is ultra-vigilant at the smallest sign of danger and eager to trigger an anxiety response 

So the next logical step would be to identify the part of you triggering it and "inviting" that part out to share its fears. There is probably a 5 or 6 years old YOU that still thinks you are 7 and that does not trust you to take over control (because you were not able to in the past) and so it took control for you. 

I know you mentioned you have been doing self-therapy but if you are not experienced or trained properly, there is limit to what you may achieve and there is no shame in getting a private therapy. 

 IFS has been mentioned here several times and this is also something I'd suggest you try. Richard Schwartz'd content seems great. I've recently been reading his book "no bad parts" and found it very helpful for this pursuit. Maybe try that for a start. It is quite exercise heavy tho so don't expect this to be just another theoretical book. This is actually a really practical step by step manual. 

Although I don't think we have IFS therapist on the forum, @flowboy seems to work alongside those lines with his clients so you guys could have a chat. If you would prefer a female guide, then reach out to @flume via her website. (i worked with her and can testify!) although not sure if she is currently taking on new clients. 

Whatever you choose, expect this to be a long term process. Behavioral modification is impossible to do quickly so be patient and keep exploring. 

Other than that, you wanna make sure your lifestyle is under control as well. Sleep, stress levels, activity, diet all have impact on neuroplasticity and major deficiencies in nutrition could have negative knock-ion effect on your cognitive performance. 

Good luck!


My Website
Cutting-Edge Nutritional Therapy and Lifestyle support. Men's Health. 
Energy Optimisation, Digestive Support, Cardiometabolic Health, Athletic Support, Mental Health, Hormones

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I found specifically working on anxiety "in the body" to be very helpful. Its a big relief to just be able to ground myself in my body, breath deeply, do some strecthes or assanas or step on my balance board whenever I feel anxious. I specifically found Peter Levines and Peter Ralstons work extremely beneficial in helping me work through tension, trauma and neuroses and enabling me to really feel at home in my body again. 

Id say its worth giving a shot. You can just buy one of their books and do the exercises and see if it does something for you.


"We all must be, and can only be, a light unto ourselves."

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