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Spiral Wizard

Satisfaction meditation vs. dissatisfaction (Buddhism inside practice)

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Leo’s new video really resonated with me but I’m a bit confused…

Currently, I’m reading “The Core Teachings of the Buddha” by Daniel Ingram. He presents ‘the three trainings’:

  1. morality (leads to a ‘Good Life’)
  2. concentration (leads to altered states/jhanas) 
  3. inside practice (leads to ultimate inside/enlightenment)

According to Daniel Ingram inside practice means, realizing the true nature of all sensation, which is synonymous to realizing ‘the three characteristics’ of all sensation: 

  • impermanence (all sensations don’t last)
  • no self (non of the sensations are you) 
  • suffering or dissatisfaction (all sensations are fundamentally dissatisfying)

All of the three characteristics are interconnected. 

Now, here are my questions:

How do we resolve the conflict between trying to be satisfied and the alleged/supposed truth of dissatisfaction?

Is the satisfaction meditation from Leo some kind of concentration practice?
I guess, in that case it would resolve the conflict because when doing concentration practice one is deliberately ignoring the true nature of all sensation and focuses on an illusory object. 
 

Would love to hear your thoughts (especially if you have direct experience). Thanks in advance! 


"The journey never ends, the point of arrival is always now." 

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Posted (edited)

49 minutes ago, Spiral Wizard said:

 

  • suffering or dissatisfaction (all sensations are fundamentally dissatisfying)

 

In my opinion this is only the beginning. You can cultivate a juicy, honey like joy through the cultivation of toaist meditation practice. The truth is not dissatisfaction. I don't think that is the point. You are the only one who can cultivate your inner garden, and you can. Life is not just dissatisfaction. 

Every insight recorded is happening at a part in your path. Don't HOLD on to any one truth or insight. There are many.

The other aspects make sense, impermanence, they are not you... And in some way any materialistic sensation is dissatisfying which is why we want to improve our state. 

Edited by Thought Art

"When you Look in the sky, Just try looking inside, God Knows what you might find... "Here Comes The Nighttime" -Arcade Fire 

Qigong and Spirituality +Vlog - Thought Art

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1 hour ago, Spiral Wizard said:

Leo’s new video really resonated with me but I’m a bit confused…

Currently, I’m reading “The Core Teachings of the Buddha” by Daniel Ingram. He presents ‘the three trainings’:

  1. morality (leads to a ‘Good Life’)
  2. concentration (leads to altered states/jhanas) 
  3. inside practice (leads to ultimate inside/enlightenment)

According to Daniel Ingram inside practice means, realizing the true nature of all sensation, which is synonymous to realizing ‘the three characteristics’ of all sensation: 

  • impermanence (all sensations don’t last)
  • no self (non of the sensations are you) 
  • suffering or dissatisfaction (all sensations are fundamentally dissatisfying)

All of the three characteristics are interconnected. 

Now, here are my questions:

How do we resolve the conflict between trying to be satisfied and the alleged/supposed truth of dissatisfaction?

Is the satisfaction meditation from Leo some kind of concentration practice?
I guess, in that case it would resolve the conflict because when doing concentration practice one is deliberately ignoring the true nature of all sensation and focuses on an illusory object. 
 

Would love to hear your thoughts (especially if you have direct experience). Thanks in advance! 

Yes essentially, insight or vipassana meditation is different from shamatha/samadhi/concentration

Insight is about noticing the three characteristics in your sensatory experience,  time and time again

Shamatha/concentration is about cultivating joy/happiness (piti/sukha) by taking a meditation object like the breathe, and letting go of your sensatory experience, by noticing how good it feels, and an inverse relationship arises: the more you let go of your sensatory experience, the more joy and happiness and peace arises which creates a positive feedback loop all the way through the Jhanas

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I think you are misunderstanding the Buddhist notion of suffering. What it basically means is that chasing material conditions and positive states is dissatisfying because they never last.

This does not mean you cannot meditate on the feeling of satisfaction itself. In fact, doing so is how you escape suffering.

Bliss and joy can be reached this way. Now, you can counter by saying that that bliss won't be permanent. Of course it won't. But I never said to get attached to permanent bliss. And it is still far better than what most people are doing, which is chasing dopamine hits.

Think of it this way: in every moment you only have one of two options: you can either be satisified or dissatisfied. Which will you be?


You are God. You are Love. You are Infinity. You are Leo.

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Sat chit ananda.

Existence conciousness bliss.

There is a reason bliss is there.

Sometimes it is not always the right thing to do and listen to someone who has the attitude of sensation=suffering. 

Life is bliss if one cultivates it and enjoy existence as it is supposed to be.

There is a reason the saying goes that GOD is LOVE.

Existence is love.

Buddhism nowadays IMO, is a bunch of nihilism.

The body and cells and everything around you vibrates and sings to the bliss of existence if you just listen and observe it.

 


Let thy speech be better then silence, or be silent.

- Pseudo-dionysius 

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