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Fiction Books that Transformed your Life

46 posts in this topic

Hello,

Name the fiction books that transformed your life. 

Fiction books are usually given a bad reputation, but that’s not always the case. There are some very well-written works of fiction with great substance. I’d like to know more about them. 

Thank you

Edited by xxxx

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The 3 Little Pigs.

A self help book I read when young. Can learn many things from the book such as building a strong foundation.

 

In before The Alchemist.

Edited by hyruga

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Wouldnt say they changed my life, technically everything changes you because change is inevitable but I digress... These are my favourites anyway...

 

Brothers Karamazov

Slaughterhouse Five 

House Of Leaves

Les Miserables (long but so worth it)

 


Dont look at me! Look inside!

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VALIS - Philip K. Dick

Island - Aldous Huxley

The Teachings of Don Juan, A Separate Reality - Carlos Castaneda

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Two Years' Vacation

The Handmaid's Tale

Journeys Beyond Earth

:ph34r::P

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44 minutes ago, SaWaSaurus said:

VALIS - Philip K. Dick

I've only read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Do you prefer VALIS? 


Hark ye yet again — the little lower layer. All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event — in the living act, the undoubted deed — there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask! How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall, shoved near to me. Sometimes I think there's naught beyond. But 'tis enough.

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I haven't read much fiction so this will be corny:

Lord of The Flies

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

1984 


Hark ye yet again — the little lower layer. All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event — in the living act, the undoubted deed — there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask! How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall, shoved near to me. Sometimes I think there's naught beyond. But 'tis enough.

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The Alchemist.

Over 200 lessons IF you know how to read it.

Your level of consciousness mirrors what you take away from the book, the reason a lot hate it is because they are still on low vibes and they can't even fathom achieving their dreams. That's why they cry about it taking place in a FICTIONAL setting, as if the character was supposed to fail or something, I guess they must happy with their own failures since it's more "realistic" ROFL.

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6 minutes ago, lmfao said:

I've only read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Do you prefer VALIS? 

VALIS is PKD's magnum opus. It's a fictionalized version his exegesis, which details his 1974 theophany. VALIS is part of a 3-part series, but each book is set in a different universe and only share similar themes, not characters or plot. VALIS > The Transmigration of Timothy Archer > The Divine Invasion, IMO.

 

Also since I remember seeing your Evangelion post, I thought this was an interesting similarity, especially considering VALIS and EVA share similar themes:

valiseva.png

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Take some time, write down your own life story, then read it. Realise it’s a fiction and that’ll transform your life. It’ll be the greatest piece of fiction you’ve ever read ?

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@SaWaSaurus  Sounds very based, might read. 

Edited by lmfao

Hark ye yet again — the little lower layer. All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event — in the living act, the undoubted deed — there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask! How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall, shoved near to me. Sometimes I think there's naught beyond. But 'tis enough.

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A bit off topic, but I was just chatting with my hairdresser about watching movies and she said that she doesn't like movies, but she likes watching some documentaries, because those are based on real life. She added that if there was any fictional elements in the documentary, she would definitely have to research and find them out.

I just found that funny. Is there really such a difference between fictional stories and real-life stories? And does it matter?

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8 hours ago, Hans said:

A bit off topic, but I was just chatting with my hairdresser about watching movies and she said that she doesn't like movies, but she likes watching some documentaries, because those are based on real life. She added that if there was any fictional elements in the documentary, she would definitely have to research and find them out.

I just found that funny. Is there really such a difference between fictional stories and real-life stories? And does it matter?

Very interesting, and I do agree to quite an extent. 

While in the ultimate sense, there isn’t any difference — for me, personally, when I read or talk about very well written works of fiction, there is a sense of clarity and detachment that I find there; the creation of characters and living multiple lives through them - individually, one at a time, and all together - a dance of imagination. There is a sort of escapism here, too - a little not-human along with the human / the more ‘free’ extension of the human mind. Fictional stories want you to get creative with your assumptions - a little beyond these everyday constraints; a relief. The personal investment of the author resides around the corners here.

In real life ‘stories’, there seems to be a constant justification, along with a considerable bias, occurring out of some kind of personal investment that is heavily centred and dependent on the concept of self. An identity is being carved out, forcing the idea of the real human on you - pushing you to identify with the human limits - through preconceptions and practicality. 

The very reason your hairdresser had to check with the fictional element is because the real one is more realistic - if you know what I mean?

Both stories are a sort of dance - one is more structured, and the other flows freely - but both are beautiful in their own way - interacting a little with each other.

Not saying either is good or bad - but each does have a slightly different taste to it. 

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this. 

 

 

Edited by xxxx

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Something in between a fictional novel and a philosophical treatise (the book is a Socratic dialogue between a man and a gorilla, and is an examination of human culture through an ecological and mythological lens), I read this back in my early twenties, and credit it in large part for helping me to move from SD Stage Orange to Green.

61eb66WSneL.jpg


"The mind is inherently embodied.
Thought is mostly unconscious.
Abstract concepts are largely metaphorical." - George Lakoff

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my boyfriend was reading a nice one called 'the overstory' which is about trees.

the only fiction ones I really read were from the horror category lol 


 

 

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On 14/01/2021 at 6:42 PM, lmfao said:

Lord of The Flies

This is a great book, shows human behavior in a very brutal yet realistic way, highly recommend it!

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I'm currently reading "Flowers for Algernon", I'm only halfway through, but it is amazing! Very cool concept and amazing way to view a lot of the developmental spectrum in a very short timeframe. It's also brought me to tears a few times ?

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3 hours ago, peanutspathtotruth said:

I'm currently reading "Flowers for Algernon", I'm only halfway through, but it is amazing! Very cool concept and amazing way to view a lot of the developmental spectrum in a very short timeframe. It's also brought me to tears a few times ?

@peanutspathtotruth This is such a unique book. Kinda cute and very emotional.

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