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electroBeam

Nihlism Train Kicking in slightly again

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I have this very slightly underlying sense of mourning. Like feeling of loss and grievance. I wouldnt care at all if the mind body died right now. as far as my experience is concerned. Its not really there anyway, so im not grieving over loosing stuff, im grieving over whats already lost. Im not depressed though. I have a good life.

How do i release this mourning? What are some nice ways of getting over this? 

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Hold a funeral, or you can try it old style and rent your clothes and hair. 

Edited by seeking_brilliance

My Imagination is a Monastery and I am its Monk- John Keats

 Join me and SirVladimir for a collection of short stories, guided visualizations, and other forms of lucid/immersive daydreaming. MindVenture Facebook group  (this is not a meetup, merely a mutual interest in lucid daydreaming) 

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Release feelings by accepting them and giving them space to be, and go through their process, working in they way they need to. Then they release themselves naturally. Also gives you the chance to contemplate and see what you are mourning for. Life is the process through birth, growth, decline and death many times over - I wonder if this mourning is for you previous self, as in the passing of your childhood or youth - sorry I don't know how old you are and I'm too polite to ask :)  I can relate to that, if it is the root of your feeling, as I'm going through middle age externally, but on the level of pure awareness I feel ageless. Strange that ?  

(PS An aside - I just discovered all these other cool emojis apart from the basic ones on the toolbar at the top! Been meaning to ask someone where they are ?️ )

Edited by silene

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Check this out. 

I found this thread of VeganAwake.. Interesting read.. Full of him quoting himself and stripping meaning purpose value from everything even from the stripping. 


I live my life in a dream; the constant threat of a rude awakening keeps me on my toes.
-Mettley Zimmer

 

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Nihility

“Isn’t ‘nothingness’, as the basis of ajata teachings, an outgrowth of nihilism?”

Nihilism is, generally, a word used by philosophers. In the nothingness of which ajata speaks, there are no words, ideas, definitions or labels which apply. In nothingness, there is not any thing—even “nihilism” has no reality there.

Nihil is Latin for “nothing”. Theologians consider whether the universe was created ex nihilo, which means “out of nothing”. But, as stated above, there is not anything which comes out of nothing. From the standpoint of nothingness—and the teachings of ajata— not anything has ever been created (starting with the universe).

Ajata is unsettling to religionists; it undercuts every doctrine that could be promulgated. Further, it indicates that there is no meaning or purpose since there has not been anything created which could have such values.

When it is possible to give up the attachment to “something”—anything—then nothingness (nihility) can be understood. But when the attempt is to try to envision nothingness in relationship to something else (“Then what’s here?”), there is still an attachment to the idea that there is some thing other than nothing which “exists”.

The teaching of nihility, like it or not, is that reality does not exist. In fact, “nothing” itself can be said neither to exist or not exist. Not anything can be said of nothing. But that doesn’t mean that the premise can’t be understood, empty as it is.

In fact, emptiness is a synonym for nothingness, as long as you can envision emptiness outside of something that is empty. So, one could say of nihility that “all is emptiness,” in a like manner—denying the reality of the “all”.

Where most people go astray in attempting to understand nothingness is this: nothing is nothing. There is not anything which nothing can be compared to, because you have nothing that you can bring to the comparison. Nothing is devoid of characteristics or questions.

In Buddhism, the synonym is called the void. But the mind immediately evokes a “void”, which is to say “not a non-void”. This is why the word “nothing” must be comprehended: we are not talking about a void that stands away somewhere from something that is not a void.

Nagarjuna says, “If there are things that are not empty, ‘voidness' may exist. If everything is empty, how can even emptiness exist?” His point: “There is nothing that is not empty”. This means “void” and “non-void” are both empty!

Shantideva says clearly, “There is nothing…how can absence—lacking all support—remain before the mind, as something present?”

Nothing does not mean something. It means nothing at all, not anything. Nothing to behold.

Is nothingness empty “like space”? Nothing is empty of space. We could say that it was nothing before empty space. Nothing does not have, or occupy, space.

All thought—particularly about nothingness—is empty".

 

Ramana: “I teach ajata.”

“Ajata means ‘non-creation,’” David Godman has written. It is a philosophical or experiential standpoint that declares or knows that neither the physical world nor the person in it have ever been created.

“Questions about the liberation or bondage of persons are therefore inadmissible and hypothetical since the persons themselves do not really exist. They are all a complete fiction brought about by the power of defective imagination.”

Godman adds: “When one…knows the truth of ajata by direct experience…such a one is sahaja nishta [experiencing sahaja].”

Godman: “This particular standpoint…known as ajata or non-becoming…was the only teaching that Ramana taught from his own experience.”

As Muruganar, one of Ramana’s most faithful disciples has said, “We have heard him say that his true teaching, firmly based on his experience, is ajata.”

Regarding such teachings, Godman has written, “Almost all his ideas were radical refutations of the concepts of physical reality that most people cherish.”

Ramana has said:

That alone is real…which is eternal and unchanging. Was (the world) ever seen without the aid of the mind? In deep sleep, there is neither mind nor world. When awake, there is the mind and there is the world. What does this invariable concomitance mean? You are familiar with the principles of inductive logic, which are considered the very basis of scientific investigation. Why do you not decide this question of the reality of the world in the light of those accepted principles of logic?

He adds:

There is no alternative for you but to accept the world as unreal if you are seeking the truth and the truth alone.

Ramana notes:

A dream as a dream does not permit you to doubt its reality. It is the same in the waking state, for you are unable to doubt the reality of the world which you see while you are awake. How can the mind, which has itself created the world, accept it as unreal? That is the significance of the comparison made between the world of the waking state and the dream world. Both are creations of the mind and, so long as the mind is engrossed in either, it finds itself unable to deny their reality. It cannot deny the reality of the dream world while it is dreaming and it cannot deny the reality of the waking world while it is awake.

Adding:

If, on the contrary, you completely withdraw your mind from the world…you will find the world of which you are now aware is just as unreal as the world in which you lived in your dream… While you are dreaming, the dream was a perfectly integrated whole. That is to say, if you felt thirsty in a dream, the illusory drinking of illusory water quenched your illusory thirst. But all this was real and not illusory to you so long as you did not know that the dream itself was illusory. Similarly with the waking world…

Only if there is creation do we have to explain how it came about… Whatever you see happening in the waking state happens only to the knower, and since the knower is unreal, nothing in fact ever happens".

-- Ajata Project Robert Wolfe

 


“Everything is honoured, but nothing matters.” — Eckhart Tolle.

"I have lived on the lip of insanity, wanting to know reasons, knocking on a door. It opens. I've been knocking from the inside." -- Rumi

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yes I remember that thread ... I seem to remember that vegan got grounded for a while for it :(  how does it relate to this one?

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43 minutes ago, seeking_brilliance said:

Hold a funeral, or you try it old style and rent your clothes and hair. 

You think im elon musk or something? Dont have the money for 6 billion people xD

 

Thanks everyone for the replies. Think i used the word nihilism a bit too quickly. It was really loss that was the issue. Anyhow it was similar to nihilism so its good stuff that others have posted.

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3 minutes ago, silene said:

how does it relate to this one?

It will cure your nihilism.  Vegan is funny af lol :D


I live my life in a dream; the constant threat of a rude awakening keeps me on my toes.
-Mettley Zimmer

 

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14 minutes ago, electroBeam said:

You think im elon musk or something? Dont have the money for 6 billion people xD

Well you only need one funeral that represents 6 billion people ? and renting your clothes and hair would technically be free besides the cost of the clothes (you know I meant ripping your clothes and hair right, old mourning practice) 


My Imagination is a Monastery and I am its Monk- John Keats

 Join me and SirVladimir for a collection of short stories, guided visualizations, and other forms of lucid/immersive daydreaming. MindVenture Facebook group  (this is not a meetup, merely a mutual interest in lucid daydreaming) 

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If everything always seemed perfect it would get boring rather quickly.

There's nothing right or wrong with mourning. The idea that one feeling is better than the other or that something needs to change creates an inner struggle or resistance.

We seem to want the good without the bad the happiness without the sadness the light without the darkness... this sets up a constant craving and aversion cycle that will never end.

 


“Everything is honoured, but nothing matters.” — Eckhart Tolle.

"I have lived on the lip of insanity, wanting to know reasons, knocking on a door. It opens. I've been knocking from the inside." -- Rumi

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43 minutes ago, ivory said:

@electroBeam I don't think your needs are being met. Do you have a good group of friends?

No but funny you mention that, connecting with others face to face is the most effective way to alleviate this issue.

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@electroBeam I read some of your posts and sorta suspected that. You seem to be in a nihilistic headspace which I can totally relate to. There are a lot of people on this forum who think spiritual people are above friends, but that's not the case. People need people man, it's not healthy to isolate. The most growth you will experience on the path is in relationship. Friends make life worth living. I learned that the hard way.

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@ivory I could live alone for eternity and not be bothered by it. Only if I had enough resources.


If you have no confidence in yourself, you are twice defeated in the race of life. But with confidence you have won, even before you start.” -- Marcus Garvey

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