AwakenedSoul444

Practices/things that reduce suffering specifically?

18 posts in this topic

What are some practices that can tackle suffering specifically? Like if someone is really interested in lessening stress, anxiety and chaos in their life what practice is best for this or what is something that provides this? 

They can be enlightening practices or just normal meditative or spiritual stuff. 

Edited by AwakenedSoul444

 

Every dark night always has a bright end. 

- Author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, AwakenedSoul444 said:

What are some practices that can tackle suffering specifically? Like if someone is really interested in lessence stress, anxiety and chaos in their life what practice is best for this or what is something that provides this? 

They can be enlightening practices or just normal meditative or spiritual stuff. 

Learn what is triggering these feelings in you. Awareness alone is Curative.

Don't resist the present moment. A lot of suffering comes from resisting what is.


“Everything is honoured, but nothing matters.” — Eckhart Tolle.

"The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance - it is the illusion of knowledge."--- Daniel J. Boorstin

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The hardest thing about meditation is starting, because you don’t know how beneficial it is until you practice. The second hardest thing is feeling so good you start skipping the practices. 

 

 

Walking Meditation

Walking meditation is a great way to begin integrating the power of meditation into your daily life. It is the first stage of meditation in action, that is, learning to be meditative while "out and about" in the world. 

It is great to do while, for example, taking a walk in the park, at the beach, or in another natural setting. 

Walking meditation is often recommended for people who are doing a lot of sitting meditation. If you are getting to sleepy, or your awareness is getting to "muddy," walking meditation can perk you up. Alternately, if you are getting to concentrated and mentally "stiff," walking meditation is a perfect way to loosen up a bit. 

Walking meditation is a common practice in Vipassana and Zen Buddhism. 



Pay close attention to the physical activity of walking slowly

1. Before walking, stand still in an open, balanced posture. Bring your awareness to the feeling of your feet touching the ground. 

2. Now begin walking. Keep your gaze fixed on the ground about six feet in front of you. This will help you to avoid distraction. 

3. Note and mentally label three parts of each step you take. The labels are "lifting," "pushing," and "dropping." 
 

     Lifting - when you are picking your foot up

     Pushing - as you are moving it forward

     Dropping - as you are lowering it to the ground


 As you make each label, pay very close attention to the actual physical sensations associated with each of these actions. 

4. After these three components become clear, you can add three more, so that the entire sequence is: "raising," "lifting," "pushing," "dropping," "touching," and "pressing."

5. Your mind will probably also engage in thinking extraneous thoughts, but just allow these to go on in the background. Your foreground attention should stay on the physical sensations of walking.

6. If you find that you have been completely lost in thought, stop walking for a moment and label the thinking as "thinking, thinking, thinking." 

7. Then re-establish your awareness on the feeling in your feet, and begin the walking meditation again. 

8. A typical session of walking meditation lasts a half an hour. 


CAUTIONS:
Make sure to watch where you are going, especially if you are around traffic, other people, etc.  

https://sites.google.com/site/psychospiritualtools/Home/meditation-practices

 

 

Awareness of Thoughts Meditation

By learning to watch your thoughts come and go during this practice, you can gain deeper insight into thinking altogether (such as its transience) and into specific relationships among your thoughts and your emotions, sensations, and desires. This practice can also help you take your thoughts less personally, and not automatically believe them.  Additionally, this meditation can offer insight into any habitual patterns of thinking and related reactions.  

Observe your thoughts as they arise and pass away.  

·       By “thoughts,” we mean self-talk and other verbal content, as well as images, memories, fantasies, and plans. Just thoughts may appear in awareness, or thoughts plus sensations, emotions, or desires. 

·       Sit or lie down on your back in a comfortable position.

·       Become aware of the sensations of breathing.

·       After a few minutes of following your breath, shift your attention to the various thoughts that are arising, persisting, and then passing away in your mind. 

·       Try to observe your thoughts instead of getting involved with their content or resisting them. 

·       Notice the content of your thoughts, any emotions accompanying them, and the strength or pull of the thought.

·       Try to get curious about your thoughts.  Investigate whether you think in mainly images or words, whether your thoughts are in color or black and white, and how your thoughts feel in your body.

·       See if you notice any gaps or pauses between thoughts.

·       Every time you become aware that you are lost in the content of your thoughts, simply note this and return to observing your thoughts and emotions. 

·       Remember that one of the brain’s major purposes is to think, and there is nothing wrong with thinking.  You are simply practicing not automatically believing and grasping on to your thoughts.  

·       When you are ready, return your attention to your breath for a few minutes and slowly open your eyes.  

Optional:

·       There are various metaphors and images you can use to help observe your thoughts.  These include:

o   Imagining you are as vast and open as the sky, and thoughts are simply clouds, birds, or planes passing through the open space.  

o   Imagining you are sitting on the side of a river watching your thoughts float by like leaves or ripples in the stream.  

o   Imagine your thoughts are like cars, buses, or trains passing by.  Every time you realize you are thinking, you can “get off the bus/train” and return to observing.


Awareness of thoughts and emotions is one of the areas of focus developed when cultivating mindfulness.  In Buddhism, mindfulness is one of the seven factors of enlightenment and the seventh instruction in the Noble Eightfold Path.  

The Seven Factors of Enlightenment:  https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/piyadassi/wheel001.html

The Four Noble Truths:https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Noble_Truths

The Noble Eightfold Path: https://tricycle.org/magazine/noble-eightfold-path/

 

CAUTIONS:

Please be gentle with yourself if you notice that you are constantly caught up in your thoughts instead of observing them.  This is both common and normal.  When you realize that you are thinking, gently and compassionately return to observing your thoughts.  

If the content of your thoughts is too disturbing or distressing, gently shift your attention to your breathing, sounds, or discontinue the practice. 

·       Remember that you are not trying to stop thoughts or only allow certain ones to arise.  Try to treat all thoughts equally and let them pass away without engaging in their content. 

·       This practice can initially be more challenging than other meditations.  As you are learning, practice this meditation for only a few minutes at a time if that is easier. 

·       It can be helpful to treat thoughts the same way that you treat sounds or body sensations, and view them as impersonal events that arise and pass away.  

·       Some people like to assign numbers or nicknames to reoccurring thoughts in order to reduce their pull and effect.

 

 

Breathe Awareness Meditation

Stress is an extremely unhealthy condition. It causes the body to release the chemical cortisol, which has been shown to reduce brain and organ function, among many other dangerous effects. Modern society inadvertently encourages a state of almost continuous stress in people. This is a meditation that encourages physical and mental relaxation, which can greatly reduce the effects of stress on the body and mind. 

Sit still and pay close attention to your breathing process.

Take a reposed, seated posture. Your back should be straight and your body as relaxed as possible.

Close your eyes, and bring your attention to your breathing process. Simply notice you are breathing. Do not attempt to change your breath in any way. Breath simply and normally. 

Try to notice both the in breath and the out breath; the inhale and the exhale. "Notice" means to actually feel the breathing in your body with your body. It is not necessary to visualize your breathing or to think about it in any way except to notice it with your somatic awareness. 

Each time your attention wanders from the act of breathing, return it to noticing the breath. Do this gently and without judgment. 

Remember to really feel into the act of breathing.

If you want to go more deeply into this, concentrate on each area of breathing in turn. Here is an example sequence:

    1. Notice how the air feels moving through your nostrils on both the in breath and the out breath. 


    2. Notice how the air feels moving through your mouth and throat. You may feel a sort of slightly raspy or ragged feeling as the air moves through your throat. This is normal and also something to feel into.


    3. Notice how the air feels as it fills and empties your chest cavity. Feel how your rib cage rises slowly with each in breath, and gently deflates with each out breath.


    4. Notice how your back expands and contracts with each breath. Actually feel it shifting and changing as you breath. 


    5. Notice how the belly expands outward with each in breath and pulls inward with each in breath. Allow your attention to fully enter the body sensation of the belly moving with each breath.


    6. Now allow your attention to cover your entire body at once as you breath in and out. Closely notice all the sensations of the body as it breathes. 

Repeat this sequence over and over, giving each step your full attention as you do it. 
Suggested time is at least 10 minutes. Thirty minutes is better, if you are capable of it. 

If you find yourself distracted by a lot of mental chatter, you can use verbal labeling as an aid to concentration. For example, on the in breath, mentally say to yourself, "Breathing in." On the out breath, say, "Breathing out." Another possibility is to mentally count each breath.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=92i5m3tV5XY

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had to pick two practices to maintain for the rest of my life I'd pick breathing exercises and going on daily walks.

In learning to breathe properly a good majority of thinking is reduced. If I had to estimate, I would say that 2/3 of my thinking ceases when I am practicing regularly. Imagine being 66% less stressed out. Also, breathing reduces the intensity of emotion making it much more bearable. Sometimes, difficult emotions even have a "feel good" quality.

I do also do a 45 minute brisk walk to get my endorphins flowing. With a daily practice I tend to be much happier even when I'm not doing anything in particular. I used to run, which was even better, but after so many injuries I decided to take things down a notch. Walking is at least sustainable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@AwakenedSoul444 Next to of course going to the root of it, there is nothing more relieving I found than Yoga Nidra. It's complete, absolute relaxation of your body. You might not have done that for years. Even in sleep you are not as relaxed as in Yoga Nidra. I highly recommend "Tripura Mandala" on YouTube. Lovely man. Take the beginner Yoga Nidra session and work up from there. 1 hour in complete relaxation = you feel like a newborn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to Shinzen Young, a fully enlightened person should be able to experience torture and be 100% ok with it.

That's really what I want, I'm really sensitive and every little thing that goes wrong in my life throws my mind into a chaos of negative thinking, stress and anxiety.

I want to get rid of all of that and finally be free of suffering.

Edited by AwakenedSoul444

 

Every dark night always has a bright end. 

- Author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi @AwakenedSoul444 , I'm at a similar stage, the teaching I'm practicing (with difficulty) is to unconditionally accept (love) all things in my awareness. Buddhists call this non-clinging, non-aversion, not picking and choosing. Just like what @AntonRogachevski says. Being radically open to what is, the here and now, the truth. But can you see the subtle irony here, when we are wanting to not suffer, we are rejecting that part of ourselves which is suffering, and so dividing ourselves between the part doing the rejecting, and that which is rejected. How do we become free from the desire to not desire?!  This is a well-known paradox (eg listen to Alan Watts videos), although the desire for enlightenment is a big step up from the usual hedonistic desires which society stirs up in us. 

The advice from most spiritual traditions, I'm afraid, is not to 'get rid of all that', as you say you want, but to dive right into it and mindfully open up our awareness to it all. It is our very resistance to our suffering which prolongs and heightens it. This is part of the difficulty of spirituality, why persistent practice over years is usually required. But being mindful of suffering is too much for beginners, so we start with 'easier' things like mindful breathing, walking, eating, mantras etc. 

I admire your ambition, very best wishes for you on the path. Torture without suffering is very high level, but we all have opportunities to push ourselves a little beyond our comfort zone and open up to the energy of anxiety, work with it to transform it into positive and creative energy. 

Edited by silene

And if you listen very hard, the tune will come to you at last. When all are one and one is all, to be a rock and not to roll. (Led Zeppelin, Stairway To Heaven). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@silene I've experienced some bliss from the spiritual work I've done, but I'm starting to think getting rid of suffering simply isn't possible without FULL enlightenment - in which supposedly one leaves the world and the body completely. Suffering will be there as long as conciousness is in a body, I'm starting to feel, I mean think about it, even if you have no resistance to the present moment, if you're EXPERIENCING a body, you're gonna experience whatever they're doing to you, the stabbing, cutting your body parts, setting you on fire etc.

Edited by AwakenedSoul444

 

Every dark night always has a bright end. 

- Author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, AwakenedSoul444 said:

@silene Suffering will be there as long as conciousness is in a body, I'm starting to feel, I mean think about it, even if you have no resistance to the present moment, if you're EXPERIENCING a body, you're gonna experience whatever they're doing to you, the stabbing, cutting your body parts, setting you on fire etc.

In a sense you're right, to be is to suffer. Thats why "life is suffering". But there is no one here!!! It's all one thing. Where is the one suffering. Look for him/her. You will never find that one. There can be a body and there can be suffering, but no one different from it saying that it's his suffering. 

All these things that intellectually don't make sense are only resolved by realizing this. Which no person can do, since there is no one. So trust that the melting into what you already are sheds all questions and all answers. It's more radical than the idea sounds. Way way wayyy more radical. That's why talking about it will never work. You have to see it. It's already true but you're confused. So am I. But since I saw it clearly I can more easily relax into it. That is peace. That is what you are. Despite there being a body or not. Do what is necessary to see that for yourself, even though "you" can't do anything. At best, assist Being in unraveling itself. Inquire into your nature constantly and you will understand it all. Don't worry too much about it. As for suffering right now, there are practices, like the one I mentioned in my above answer, which will guide you. Especially Yoga Nidra Shows you the bliss of a body. Try it ❤️

Edited by peanutspathtotruth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, peanutspathtotruth said:

In a sense you're right, to be is to suffer. Thats why "life is suffering". But there is no one here!!! It's all one thing. Where is the one suffering. Look for him/her. You will never find that one. There can be a body and there can be suffering, but no one different from it saying that it's his suffering. 

All these things that intellectually don't make sense are only resolved by realizing this. Which no person can do, since there is no one. So trust that the melting into what you already are sheds all questions and all answers. It's more radical than the idea sounds. Way way wayyy more radical. That's why talking about it will never work. You have to see it. It's already true but you're confused. So am I. But since I saw it clearly I can more easily relax into it. That it peace. That is what you are. Despite there being a body or not. Do what is necessary to see that for yourself, even though "you" can't do anything. At best, assist Being in unraveling itself. Inquire into your nature constantly and you will understand it all. Don't worry too much about it. As for suffering right now, there are practices, like the one I mentioned in my above answer, which will guide you. Especially Yoga Nidra Shows you the bliss of a body. Try it ❤️

I understand all of what you're saying, but I'm serious about the soul leaving the body part, at least 3 good spiritual teachers/sources I know say the self "returns" to source and that means the soul literally leaving the physical body and who knows what happens to it. There's also a different spiritual movement than the "traditional" enlightenment claiming if you advance spiritually enough, you literally ascend to another reality (by leaving your old body behind)


 

Every dark night always has a bright end. 

- Author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@AwakenedSoul444 "You" ascend to another realm, what "You" do you mean? The thought that there really is a you is the root reason of why there is so much doubt about what enlightenment is and what happens to "you". There is a full circle, you still seem to wish to escape from this here, then, in this other dimension, you can be at peace. No. Whether in a body or not, you ARE. That's all you know. Follow that. Forget all your ideas about enlightenment, they don't matter and are false anyways. Find out for yourself. Be that which you already are and try to find a someone in that. Try to find a suffering in that. No matter in which dimension you are, you are that which you always are. No change of the scenery will change anything about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, peanutspathtotruth said:

@AwakenedSoul444 "You" ascend to another realm, what "You" do you mean? The thought that there really is a you is the root reason of why there is so much doubt about what enlightenment is and what happens to "you". There is a full circle, you still seem to wish to escape from this here, then, in this other dimension, you can be at peace. No. Whether in a body or not, you ARE. That's all you know. Follow that. Forget all your ideas about enlightenment, they don't matter and are false anyways. Find out for yourself. Be that which you already are and try to find a someone in that. Try to find a suffering in that. No matter in which dimension you are, you are that which you always are. No change of the scenery will change anything about it.

Dude, you don't have to explain this to me I'm not a newbie in spirituality. I'm trying to tell you that at super advanced levels of enlightenment, the soul leaves the body and there's no longer an experience of the body.


 

Every dark night always has a bright end. 

- Author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, AwakenedSoul444 said:

Dude, you don't have to explain this to me I'm not a newbie in spirituality. I'm trying to tell you that at super advanced levels of enlightenment, the soul leaves the body and there's no longer an experience of the body.

No that's why I tell you, you don't understand. It's so dangerous to think you know what this really means, even though it sounds basic. This basic stuff is more radical than it sounds. And thinking of a soul leaving a body is not "very advanced", it's again creating a duality. I did understand what you mean and I think forget about this idea, it doesn't serve you, it's just more stories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/11/2019 at 11:04 PM, AwakenedSoul444 said:

@silene I've experienced some bliss from the spiritual work I've done, but I'm starting to think getting rid of suffering simply isn't possible without FULL enlightenment - in which supposedly one leaves the world and the body completely. Suffering will be there as long as conciousness is in a body, I'm starting to feel, I mean think about it, even if you have no resistance to the present moment, if you're EXPERIENCING a body, you're gonna experience whatever they're doing to you, the stabbing, cutting your body parts, setting you on fire etc.

There's something here about learning to distinguish between pain and suffering. Physical pain is an essential function of life, a survival mechanism, without pain we would be very accident prone. If we didn't feel pain from a fire or knife cut or other injuries we would be in trouble. It's the body's way of telling the mind that there's a problem to sort out. Spirituality isn't trying to stop that. I understand spirituality to be about making us more sensitive to our feelings. not less. 

Suffering is something to do with resisting the pain, denying it or getting into a disfunctional cycle of reliving painful memories instead of keeping the past in the past. 

Emotional pain vs suffering is an interesting one too, pain is a natural response to trauma and loss in the present; suffering is a disfunctional relationship with past memories or anxiety about the future. 

 


And if you listen very hard, the tune will come to you at last. When all are one and one is all, to be a rock and not to roll. (Led Zeppelin, Stairway To Heaven). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fun exercising til you sweat

A clean, light, tasty, diet

Socializing with friends & building deep meaningful relationships 

Trauma work

Doing work that you find fulfilling and meaningful 

Having a higher meaning and purpose for your life 

Deep breathing 

Having an inspiring, compelling vision 

Edited by d0ornokey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now